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Building Yeovil Pen Mill in EM.

Tony W

Member
Location
North Notts
Certainly in my experience trying to build fixed 1:8 obtuse crossings on the curve with anything less than scale width flangeways (and even with) can be fraught with difficulties. Margins for error are small to nonexistent. Propelling stock on curves tends to push the leading flange of any vehicle outwards against the outer rail and the rear flange inwards against the inner rail. Unless there is adequate checking at the crossing one or other flange can go the wrong side of the point rail with undesirable results.
Regards
Tony.
 
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AndyB

Member
That looks lovely, Andrew. I hope you get away with your fixed, curved K crossings.

Many years ago I built a curved 2FS fixed diamond at 1:8 for a customer, When it came to be used recently, he spent hours trying to make everything work. Pushing short wheelbase wagons proved its downfall. Every time he went bed with it working OK, he woke up to find it had gone back to derailing the wagons. In the end I built him a replacement at 1:7. Perhaps the short wheelbase wagons could crab more than the other vehicles, we don't know.

Incidentally, the 2FS standards are the same proportions as EM, except the flange depth is proportionally greater at 0.5mm, instead of 0.35mm.

Keith

I could be wrong (again) but it looks to me that it's switched rather than fixed.
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Andrew a stunning piece of track building, larger turnouts and crossings do have an air of spender about them. I currently have a facing crossing with a V8 and 12' heal, with hopefully the rail joints in the correct positions and 4 timber check rails
Thanks very much John, and yes I agree they do have a certain grace about them. I find though that preventing wheel drop at the knuckle progressively harder to avoid the longer they get.
kind regards
Andrew
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
That looks lovely, Andrew. I hope you get away with your fixed, curved K crossings.

Many years ago I built a curved 2FS fixed diamond at 1:8 for a customer, When it came to be used recently, he spent hours trying to make everything work. Pushing short wheelbase wagons proved its downfall. Every time he went bed with it working OK, he woke up to find it had gone back to derailing the wagons. In the end I built him a replacement at 1:7. Perhaps the short wheelbase wagons could crab more than the other vehicles, we don't know.

Incidentally, the 2FS standards are the same proportions as EM, except the flange depth is proportionally greater at 0.5mm, instead of 0.35mm.

Keith
Thanks very much Keith, I fear that it will give trouble but looking on the bright side the double slip is not on the main running line, but in the goods yard so I'm telling myself that if it is a problem it can wait for later to be sorted. And sorting maybe putting in moving K crossings, or completely replacing it with a couple of Y's. We'll see...!
Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
I could be wrong (again) but it looks to me that it's switched rather than fixed.
Certainly in my experience trying to build fixed 1:8 obtuse crossings on the curve with anything less than scale width flangeways (and even with) can be fraught with difficulties. Margins for error are small to nonexistent. Propelling stock on curves tends to push the leading flange of any vehicle outwards against the outer rail and the rear flange inwards against the inner rail. Unless there is adequate checking at the crossing one or other flange can go the wrong side of the point rail with undesirable results.
Regards
Tony.
Hello Tony
Well, we've discussed this before and I very much fear that it'll end in tears, because if you'd find it a challenge to build, then with my skill level, a lot of luck would have to be on my side to get away with it!
Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
I could be wrong (again) but it looks to me that it's switched rather than fixed.
Not so much wrong, I think Andy, as a different piece of trackwork. There is a double slip in question which Keith is referring to and which I (foolishly) built with fixed K crossings, and there's a single slip on the mainline which I built with moving ones.

I really should download a fresh box file of the current plan to remind everyone of what I'm trying to achieve, then all would be clear.

Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Martin Wynne

Admin
Location
West of the Severn UK
Info
Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Thanks very much Keith, I fear that it will give trouble but looking on the bright side the double slip is not on the main running line, but in the goods yard so I'm telling myself that if it is a problem it can wait for later to be sorted. And sorting maybe putting in moving K crossings, or completely replacing it with a couple of Y's. We'll see...!

Hi Andrew,

You can significantly improve the checking of fixed K-crossings by raising the check rails above the level of the running rails. For example by using code 100 FB rail (with the foot filed down) with code 75 running rails.

The prototype does that too nowadays, although it means locomotives with flangeless drivers have to be banned.

For an existing K-crossing you may be able to solder a nickel-silver strip on top of the existing check rail. Maybe 1mm x 0.8mm strip. File back to match the rail.

Have some Elastoplast handy for when rail cleaning. :)

cheers,

Martin.
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Hi Andrew,

You can significantly improve the checking of fixed K-crossings by raising the check rails above the level of the running rails. For example by using code 100 FB rail (with the foot filed down) with code 75 running rails.

The prototype does that too nowadays, although it means locomotives with flangeless drivers have to be banned.

For an existing K-crossing you may be able to solder a nickel-silver strip on top of the existing check rail. Maybe 1mm x 0.8mm strip. File back to match the rail.

Have some Elastoplast handy for when rail cleaning. :)

cheers,

Martin.
Thanks for the tip Martin, I shall remember this (I hope) when it all goes horribly wrong...
Andrew
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
I thought I'd remind you of the track plan of Yeovil Pen Mill as it's several years since I posted anything like this. So I carefully took a photo of the plan, cropped it, and managed to upload it, only to then see that it was an old version that didn't include the double slip with fixed K crossing that we've been looking at recently. It was a previous incarnation, somewhat half-baked, that I abandoned when Martin made creating slips a one-click operation (what a genius!).

So that is at the extreme right-hand side of the plan, middle top-ish Anyway the single slip is there albeit probably in its original guise with fixed K crossings since modified to moving ones. i shall do the job properly soon, but for now at least you have some sort of reference.

View attachment 579
Kind regards
Andrew
 
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AndyB

Member
We try and shop once a week, I am mainly there as a labourer. We have always thought Morrisons have the best meat of the supermarkets, and when we moved Morrisons was our nearest shop. This week we got a super bit of beef (it was on offer). Quite often we get 3 meals from a joint. I go off and wander the wine and coffee isles, like all supermarkets they have their own range and I like trying their "The Best" range. I prefer to drink less but slightly better these days. Rather than 2 for a tenner spend £7 or £8 on a bottle, for some you might have to spend a tenner. But its so much better. Old world wines seem to me to be better

We went to a wine tasting at a vineyard in Deadham (well worth it) and a similar one in Italy (lake Garda) where they tell you lots about wine, but they open up your eyes to try something different. I must have a look at other reds, but I do like the less full bodied red wines.

The Falanghina will have to wait a week, we love going to Italy and drinking their wines, now there is much more selection available in our shops

I happened to notice Steven Spurrier has died. He was English and owned a wine shop in Paris. There is a movie about him.
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
Last week I thought I would have a change of reds, good job as the Beaujolais villages had sold out. I got a Valpolicella Ripasso

The while is very light and fruity, enjoyable as most of them have beem with one exception not to my taste (perhaps I am easily pleased)
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Having unintentionally deleted the plan from my earlier post of last week I've now brought this one up to date. The board that I'm currently working on is no6 the far right hand end of the station or north end.

Yeovil Plan vers3 (1).jpg
 
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and a little more progress...
The switches are now all in on the three remaining turnouts on this board.

View attachment 296


And here is one of the tie bars under construction, over length at present, this is 3mm wide copper / fiberglass laminate, presumably not called copper paxolin...? suitably gapped twice per side to be on the safe side which seems to give a nice flexible / adjustable result. and one further refinement, I've rounded the top edge to prevent any likelihood of shorting out against the underside of the stock rail. Not sure it was necessary but I did it anyway.


View attachment 297

Food and a glass of Claret are calling so I'd better go...
Andrew
Hello Andrew,

I do like all the good work you are doing on your railway, very impressive. I've been puzzled for a while about a rather unusual looking vehicle on your baseboard. It looks like a bogie connected with a length of wire and has what appears to be a wire frame above. Could you share details of it please?

Kind regards

Roger
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Hello Andrew,

I do like all the good work you are doing on your railway, very impressive. I've been puzzled for a while about a rather unusual looking vehicle on your baseboard. It looks like a bogie connected with a length of wire and has what appears to be a wire frame above. Could you share details of it please?

Kind regards

Roger
Hello Roger

Thanks for the compliment. The vehicle you mention I built years ago on Iain Rices suggestion I think? It is just two W irons connected by some brass tube and rod with a vertical wire (arm) at each corner, bent through 90 degrees about 3" above the wheels. When it's on level track the ends of the wire, which point at each other line up. When I run it over my point work they usually go out of alignment, and the degree to which they miss align determines whether I need to do something about the unevenness or not!

I think it might have been called a "Diplometre", i.e. shows up dips in the track by exaggerating the effect due to the 3" length of the arms. I now don't recall where I saw the original design, Railway Modeller, MRJ or even one of Iain's books. But in any case, a simple thing to construct.

Hope that answers your question. If I've left anything out, please do ask.

Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Martin Wynne

Admin
Location
West of the Severn UK
Info
Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Signal Box diagram?
 
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