TEMPLOT 3D PLUG TRACK - To get up to speed with this experimental project  click here.   Watch an introductory video about Plug Track at  Bexhill West.

  • The Plug Track functions are experimental and still being developed. Some of the earlier pages of this topic are now out-of-date.

    For an updated overview of this project see this topic.   For some practical modelling aspects of using Plug Track see Building 3D Track.

    The assumption is that you have your own machines on which to experiment, or helpful friends with machines. Please do not send Templot files to commercial laser cutting or 3D printing firms while this project is still experimental, because the results are unpredictable and possibly wasteful.

    Some pages of this and other topics include contributions from members who are creating and posting their own CAD designs for 3D printing and laser-cutting. Do not confuse them with Templot's own exported CAD files. All files derived from Templot are © Martin Wynne.
  • The Plug Track functions are experimental and still being developed.

    For an updated overview of this project see this topic.   For some practical modelling aspects of using Plug Track see Building 3D Track.

    The assumption is that you have your own machines on which to experiment, or helpful friends with machines. Please do not send Templot files to commercial laser cutting or 3D printing firms while this project is still experimental, because the results are unpredictable and possibly wasteful.

    Some pages of this and other topics include contributions from members who are creating and posting their own CAD designs for 3D printing and laser-cutting. Do not confuse them with Templot's own exported CAD files. All files derived from Templot are © Martin Wynne.

Plywood for laser-cutting

Quick reply >

Phil G

Member
Location
New Zealand
I can't see the need for shallow pockets, unless I'm missing something?

Hi James, the real reason for looking at pocking the cork is I can't guarantee I can all ways get the same size of plywood what I have found if you get hat they have in the country at these more thinner sizes, IE anything below 3 is really nominal so of my so call 2 is in fact 2.5 thick and some of my 3 is 3.1 My thinking was if I pocket the cork, I get the option of adjusting the pocket depth to suit, Plus it becomes a perfect location template in its own right, and also helps deaden the sound.
I did wonder if fully burn out pockets would be a dirty job. the slowness I expected.

plan B I will try burning the 4 tight corners of the cork to pocket size and then mill out the main body of the pocket.
cheers
Phil,
 
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Ahh, I get it. Sorry, when I wrote that earlier I thought you were just pocketing the plug sockets. I can now picture the situation more clearly. Have you thought about maybe bonding the cork to a piece of thin ply and running it through something like a drum sander. Most joinery shops have them and they're great for reducing cork to a consistent thickness. You could probably get away with just taping the edges to a backing board with some double sided tape, and peeling it off afterwards. Just a thought.
 
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I am not sure 10 watts will be enough to get good stable results IE likely will need two pass or too slow a speed thus getting too much over burn, but there is only one way to find out.
@Phil G @James Walters

Hi Phil,

This might be a crazy idea from someone who hasn't got a laser-cutter. :unsure:

But if it won't cut all the way though from one side, why not turn it over and cut again from the other side?

You can easily mirror the plan in Templot.

It needs a reasonably accurate means of register to get the second side in the right place on the bed, but if it's the underside it's not too critical. The tapered chair plugs are located by the first 1mm depth on top, so provided you can cut the top side accurately to that depth it should work ok. Turn the power down on the second side so that it doesn't cut deeper than needed.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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Hi Phil,
Have you tried BBS Timbers
They appear to sell 2.5mm birch ply.

Do you particularly want ply as you dont appear to be wanting re-arrange your timbers so that the grain is longitudinal?

Maybe the MDF available in NZ has a more consistent thickness.

Steve
 
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I can confirm that cutting from each side works a treat. One needs to think it through though. I have a little registration jig which I have made for my machine which I use on certain jobs.
With the correct focussing, it can minimise the kerf draft and make clean up easier and more accurate for very thick parts, say 12mm+
 
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Hi Phil,
Have you tried BBS Timbers
They appear to sell 2.5mm birch ply.

Do you particularly want ply as you dont appear to be wanting re-arrange your timbers so that the grain is longitudinal?

Maybe the MDF available in NZ has a more consistent thickness.

Steve
Hi Steve,
yes BBS is one of the supplies I have tried :)
re the grain, I am not looking for the exact gain per every timber, however because I am modeling to prototype scale for Heaton Norris junction most of the curves are quite gentle, so most of the grain direction will be applicable.
Bit unsure about MDF most of what is make locally uses urea formaldehyde as the bonding material, so not over keen to
laser that. Not whilst I am still such a novice anyway.
cheers
Phil
 
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Last edited:
hi phil,
Do you have any model aircraft stores near you?
They often have suitable high quality sheets of ply.
Steve
Hi Steve,
There are only two model shops in the whole of Auckland, both stock a bit of everything and not much specific.
The down side of a total population of 5 million is not many outlets to choose from :(
cheers
Phil
 
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