Fresh air & photos

Hello Martin,

I am curious about the building at the back of the graveyard, what is it and what was it originally designed to be? If it were a residence I would expect the doors to the outside world to be on the lower level. Perhaps a stables with a feed store on the upper floor.

It has a chimney, so internal fireplaces, so perhaps not a stables.

Regards,

Pierre

PS: I very much enjoy this thread and love looking at the pictures.
 
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Martin Wynne

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I am curious about the building at the back of the graveyard, what is it and what was it originally designed to be? If it were a residence I would expect the doors to the outside world to be on the lower level. Perhaps a stables with a feed store on the upper floor.

It has a chimney, so internal fireplaces, so perhaps not a stables.

Regards,

Pierre

PS: I very much enjoy this thread and love looking at the pictures.
@Pierre

Hi Pierre,

Thanks. :)

It's a summer house in the garden of the Old Rectory. The photo is looking at the back of it -- the gate leads from the churchyard into the rectory garden.

It's a listed building, more info:

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.u...ediately-north-at-rectory-stourport-on-severn

More pictures:

https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4739477

https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4739294

cheers,

Martin.
 
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@Pierre

Hi Pierre,

Thanks. :)

It's a summer house in the garden of the Old Rectory. The photo is looking at the back of it -- the gate leads from the churchyard into the rectory garden.

It's a listed building, more info:

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.u...ediately-north-at-rectory-stourport-on-severn

More pictures:

https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4739477

https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4739294

cheers,

Martin.
Hello Martin,

When I looked at the photos you linked I realised that what I was looking at in your photo was the side of the building not the rear. The architecture looks like that used by the Great Central for their platform buildings but not so in this case. The clue was the caption that "the building overlooked the garden", when I looked at the site in Google satellite view it became apparent where the garden was and then the front and rear of the building.

Best regards,

Pierre
 
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Martin Wynne

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When I looked at the photos you linked I realised that what I was looking at in your photo was the side of the building not the rear.
@Pierre

Thanks Pierre. I've always assumed that what is visible from the churchyard is the rear of the summerhouse, but on reflection it's obvious that the front of a summerhouse would face towards the house. Which puts the steps more logically at one side, rather than the rear, of the building.

But we are no nearer to knowing what happened to the chimney. :)

cheers,

Martin.
 
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AndyB

Member
I should say I hiked for miles to take these shots but they were really taken at the back door.

DSCN5052.JPG


DSCN5069.JPG


DSCN5070.JPG
 
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Martin Wynne

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With the news today that the North Wales slate landscape has been awarded Unesco World Heritage status, I thought maybe I would post again these 1969 pics of the Maenofferen Slate Quarry.

maenofferen_wagons_1969_1280x720.jpg



maenofferen_drum_1969_1140x760.jpg



maenofferen_1969_1280x720.jpg


The original fresh air topic with more pics and notes (very long page, slow to load) is at:

https://85a.uk/templot/archive/topics/topic_3228.php#p25405

cheers,

Martin.
 
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Martin Wynne

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A grey day today for summer. :(

Just looking at this live webcam from the Seaton Tramway, and hoping all those staycationing in the South-West are having a nice time.


Martin.
 
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Martin Wynne

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Spot any eggshell in the grass?

freeguard_bench_2700x1900.jpg



Ups and downs.

orange_and_blue_1378x960.jpg



HS2 progress.

hs2_progress_1150x1150.jpg



Martin.
 
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AndyB

Member
OK so pushing the title of the tread a bit but we finally have some fresh air as the smoke seems to have been blown away and it actually rained a bit yesterday. Here's my fresh air machine :)

It's a Fiat but I don't think much of it was ever in Italy. It's a Fiat (Spider) body with a Fiat engine. The car was assembled in Hiroshima on a Mazda chassis.

DSCN5078.JPG
 
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Matt M.

Member
Location
Australia
Hi Andy,

Suspension is different as well. I can't remember if the engine is built up in Italy or Poland, but a lot of the
mechanical parts like water pumps, clutches etc, are made in China of course.

International car building. I'm not sure it is a better or worse thing.
Most the major issues I've had with the 156 JTS Sports Wagon have been with German
company parts. And a number of those were legacy issues that started before high milage.

Electrics in modern cars just seem to collapse at around 180,000 kms.

Anyone I know who bought a modern 124 spider seems happy with it. Especially the Arbarth version.

Thanks for the photo.

Matt M.
 
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Martin Wynne

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Lovely pic of the bench and tree Martin. I think my wife will like it. May she use it as the basis for a painting?
@AndyB

Of course. Glad you like it. :)

Martin.
 
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Derek

Member
Location
UK, Midlands
Too many health & safety risks with letting the public go near anything like this. One of the Canal and River Trust guys told me that suggestions had been made to put barriers around canal locks to stop people falling into deep water when the lock chamber was full. How did we ever manage to stay safe in the old days ??
Many years back- 1988 in fact- someone not a million miles away from the computer I am writing this on, fell into a canal outside the lock on the 'upper' side- right by the sluice gate, which was in use. It was a few second- seeming like hours- of battling to keep head above water, before realising that the canal was about a foot shallower than when he stood up; mind you, if the sluice hadn't had bars over it, it might have been a different story.

The result: He learned to watch where he was going in future near deep water. 33 years later he is still alive to tell the story. He did that without the nanny state and its damned fences.

If anyone suggests that 'he' was me, without photographic evidence, I shall deny everything.

A lot of my childhood was spent playing with friends around the local canal basins and locks in the 1950s. I don't remember any of us falling in, or anyone else.
I wish I'd read that before I posted the comments above...

Derek
 
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AndyB

Member
Hi Andy,

Suspension is different as well. I can't remember if the engine is built up in Italy or Poland, but a lot of the
mechanical parts like water pumps, clutches etc, are made in China of course.

International car building. I'm not sure it is a better or worse thing.
Most the major issues I've had with the 156 JTS Sports Wagon have been with German
company parts. And a number of those were legacy issues that started before high milage.

Electrics in modern cars just seem to collapse at around 180,000 kms.

Anyone I know who bought a modern 124 spider seems happy with it. Especially the Arbarth version.

Thanks for the photo.

Matt M.

Hi Matt,

I had to Google 156 JTS :) Not too many Alphas around here but there are some. Not sure if your model is among them.

My 124 is the "old geezer" version with the automatic transmission and the subdued exhaust which suits me fine as I am an old geezer. Fortunately I'm still sufficiently nimble to actually get in and out of the thing! It doesn't get out much for half the year. The roads have to be salted here in Winter so I try to use it whenever there's an opportunity to put the roof down during the warmer months. I've had it for three years now and I've only ever seen three other 124s despite motoring through most of the the western US states.

Cheers,
Andy
 
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Matt M.

Member
Location
Australia
Import into the USA had stopped with the 164 in 1995 and after that some specials like the 8C were brought in.
I think the return was with the 4C in 2014 followed by the Gulia sedan and the Stelvio crossover.

I America missed out on the 156 family and the 916 series GTV and Spider.
Also 155s, Breras, 147s, 159s, Alfa Spider ( a Brera based car), the GT ( a 156 based coupe).
The MiTo a very undercooked small car (though the door mirrors are the same as the Maserati GT)
and also the 166 a much unloved big car.

The 147/156 series sits on Fiat's Punto platform and debuted two new bits of tech being the much
loathed Selespeed robotic manual and the JTS 2 litre direct injected petrol engine.
Both being the first of their type in a production car.

No salted roads around here but being on the coast sea spray is an issue even 3 or 4 kilometres inland.

They last fine if you take care of them.

Regards, Matt M.

I should have attached a photo.

Alfa 33 1.7. I.E. - 1988 build with over 380,000 km.
Alfa Romeo 33 1.7 I.E..jpg

Alfa 156 Sportswagon JTS 2.0 2002 build 232,000 km
Alfa Romeo 156 JTS SW.jpg
 
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Phil O

Member
Location
Plymouth.
Hi Martin,

Those stairs look familiar, but for the moment I can't remember where they are, a clue would be helpful.

Thanks.
 
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