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5 way switch just for the fun

Quick reply >
I found a picture of "the real thing" taken at the Lourdes yard where pilgrim's trains were stocked
Wissenheim2018_0024.jpg


hope you'll like :)
 
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Justme Igor

Member
Thread starter
I think that I can understand where you're coming from in a turnout that is around 8 feet long in old English money. What is the width over the outer most rails at the heel end of the turnout?.
The heel end? i am sorry i can not do a proper translation (tried even with google)
But i think you mean the end of the turnout?
If not please tell me where to take a measurement(and what the heel is ;))
20210617_180014.jpg

20210617_175932.jpg

Thanks in advance with best regards, Igor
 
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Justme Igor

Member
Thread starter
The joining bars between them are referred to as stretcher bars in English.
You can have more than two stretcher bars on long switch rails.
20210617_171151.jpg


20210617_171237.jpg

20210617_171328.jpg

I think you are referring to something i already planed to do?
I could be wrong?
I am planning to make two bars at those two points, one of them is going to be the switch bar(pointing finger)
Yes sorry i still have to sand all the points.

Stretcher bars yes i was referring to switch rails, thanks

The other thing used in real life to hold the switch rails to gauge are 'switch stops' and
'gauge pins/stud bolts' or 'gauge/distance blocks'.

Switch stops are mounted on the switch rails and project out so that when the blade is up against
the stock rail and carrying the load of the passing train they bear against the stock rail web thus
resisting the outward movement of the switch rails and therefore changing the gauge.
I am going to sand them at the other side(instead of the inside), i agree, looks way better and is better for the rolling stock, smother running, i think.

Hope this is useful information to help you overcome your lateral and twist movement issues.
Very helpful and very wanted information for me! thanks again, please keep the info coming
With best regards Igor
 
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Justme Igor

Member
Thread starter
what is the reason for using Ali strip
If you are standing at 20-25 meters of height on a real station yard, you will see exactly the same in scale, and it is a factor 10 cheaper.
I really admire the people that are taking great lengths to mimic every chair screw nut fish plate ect, but for me that is a bridge to far(??for now!!).
I am planning t give the safety rails some extra support, because you see it from a distance.
You wont see the details at a 2 meters (standing)to 4 (to 6-8) meter distance(watching), just in real life at a 20 meters high scaffolding.
I posted pictures on this forum, you can find them on resources.
https://85a.uk/templot/club/index.php?media/dsc00390-jpg.192/https://85a.uk/templot/club/index.php?media/page-4Was 15 meters in height max btw when the pic's where taking

I hope this will answer your question?, if not please let me know!
 
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Justme Igor

Member
Thread starter
They were eventually supplied with a portable adzing machine which must have been a relief
as some of the timbers used were quite dense and hard to work.
As a carpenter: yes it is/was a relief, i can imaging that one, there are some woods species, and dont forget the knots/branches in the wood...that will make work on it very difficult
If you can get some piece of iron wood, take your hand saw compare that to a soft wood(what ever hard wood btw), cutting length wise.
You want to know your wood? this is the way, saw it length wise with a hand saw...it will apply for all the woods

With best regards Igor
 
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Phil O

Member
Location
Plymouth.
Thanks Igor,

That's around 16 inches in our old measurements, that's a big WOW and I think it must be a bit unwieldy moving it around.

Thanks for sharing.

Phil.
 
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Matt M.

Member
Location
Australia
Hi Igor,

Just to start off.
This is a Victorian State Railways formation. Late 1940s I think.

The spreader bracket is also called a stretcher bar, connecting bar, connecting rod and gauge rod.
Victorian Railways Australia 16'-6%22 Right Hand 107 L.B. Points.jpg

Note the spreader bracket has a part that goes under the stock rail to inhibit lift in the switch rails.
This is more often seen in bars made from flat stock. I haven't seen any done that way with round bars.

Later stretcher bars have the flat rotated to a horizontal plane and a slot that catches a lug from the tie plate.
These are referred to as 'Slotted' stretcher bars. These do the same job to stop lift in the switch rails.

Sorry I don't have a good none copyright picture of any of these.

This is the stop bracket used by Vic Rail on this type of turnout.
Victorian Railway Australia Switch Blade Stops.jpg

These were mounted on the switch rail.

This is a 1922 NSWGR 60lb lead/points/turnout.
Standard 60 lb Points Australian Rail 1923.jpg

The heel of the switch is where it pivots from. The toe is the free end that moves inland out of contact with the stock rails.
Note this is a loose heel switch. The Heel chock sits behind the heel fishplate rather than being combined with it.
Note also the gauge stops and the heel stop that mount from the stock rail.

Cutting a flat into a sleeper fro hold either a flat bottom rail or a chair or plat is a common thing during certain
periods.

This would be from the 1860s. Double head rail chairs.
Lithgow Valley With double headed rail chairs cut into sleeoer tops as require at the time.jpg



This is a adzing gauge with no incline for those times you need to let into a sleeper for a plate which may or may not have inclination.
Adzing gauge with zero incline for setting plates into sleepers.jpg


The cutting requirements for the adzing machine.
Sleeper Sawing Adzing and Boring Machine composite of rail bases in correct position for gauge.jpg


This is only required on running lines. Formations and yards are vertical.
Showing the 1 in 20 cut in the sleeper for 70 lb and 60 lb Rails.jpg





Regards, Matt M.
 
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Justme Igor

Member
Thread starter
Matt,
Thank you very much for your replay, a lot of very good info.
This will keep me busy for the next couple of days (y)

Where do you find such info?

The heel blocks and the spreaders are going to be implemented.
I think the heel block is a key missing element that i really need for several reasons.

With best regards Igor
 
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Matt M.

Member
Location
Australia
Igor,

I find this information during research into drawings for the NSWGR.
Been doing it for 12 years mostly concentrating on the Mechanical Branch
which is locomotives and rolling stock. But in preparation for an S7 layout
that didn't eventuate I became very interested in the prototype's development
of permanent way.

Ruined looking at model railways because nothing looks right anymore.

Fishplate joined loose heel switch.
Fishplate joined loose heel switch.jpg



Heel Block joined loose heel switch.
Heel Block joined loose heel switch.jpg


The heel is still loose and is joined by a fishplate. Some of the later ones have a pivot pin under the switch rail as well.
Just like PECO.
Solid Heel Joint Plan View.jpg


Heel-less switches are different animals, but I don't think your aluminium strip would enjoy that much flexing.

Regards, Matt M.
 
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Matt M.

Member
Location
Australia
Hi Igor,

Glad the information is useful.

Something went slightly wrong with your translating or perhaps "spell check" strikes again.
I wasn't trying for satire so I think you were after 'satisfying' as opposed to 'satirising'.

Regards, Matt M.
 
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Justme Igor

Member
Thread starter
wasn't trying for satire so I think you were after 'satisfying' as opposed to 'satirising'.
Yes i saw my mistake,it was the spell check. (i was very tired and there was a red line)
I did not mean satire but satisfying!
Very sorry for the goof up.
I refuse to use google translate.
Sorry for the inconvenience.
Your info is gold! to me.
Thanks

With best regards Igor
 
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Matt M.

Member
Location
Australia
Hi Igor,

No apology needed. Nor was it inconvenient. Just wondered.
You are doing better with English than I would translating from and into Dutch.

Regards, Matt M.
 
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