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GWR Catch points

Quick reply >
Location
Up North
Hello,
I have been reading David Smith's GWR track book, specifically the section on catch points and to be honest there is so much information punctuated by words like usually or sometimes that I am at a bit of a loss to understand what constituted a standard GWR catch point. I am refering to the ones used in areas such as stations, good yards or refuge/goods loops.

I think I can understand the reason why single tongue types were perfectly suited to low speed areas to keep errant vehicles away from main running lines. There are several good photos ( Brent goods yard for example ) showing examples and several references to quantities of stretcher bars and the use of sole plates ( or not ). Where two sidings bore down towards the main line there seems to be cases where the catch points were installed in each discrete siding and others where the catch points were placed in the lead of the turnout that joined them. Does this depend purely on the layout of track at the site and space available ?

As to the use of flexible or old style switches I gather that this would have followed the practice in use at the time of relaying. I am mainly interested in two time periods - 1910 to 1923 ( so I can have 4/6 wheel coaches in several liveries for a layout 'based' somewhere near Llanfyllin ) and late 1950's BR(W) days as I like the Cambrian lines/Ivatt 2-6-0 locos. What is a simple rule to follow for each of these time periods ??

I must confess to only ever laying two catch points ( that weren't on the Templot plan ) and neither was on a layout that followed any prototype :( I can imagine getting in a mess trying to insert them into the lead of a turnout in Templot .....

Thanks in anticipation.
Rob
 
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Keith Armes

Member
Location
Macclesfield
Hi Rob,

It seems very difficult to get information on catch points, doesn't it. In the past, I've put the catch switches in the same place as ordinary crossover switches for a parallel siding and in the same place as branch crossover switches for diverging sidings.

We wait for more definitive answers! Perhaps there are just too many possibilities.
Keith
 
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Phil O

Member
Location
Plymouth.
I don't think there is any clear cut rules on catch points, if you're modelling a known prototype you can see if you can find photos to show what was actually fitted. If you're modelling a fictional location and your unsure that you have selected the correct type(s), you could post your box file here and see what the team thinks.
 
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Rob Manchester

Member
Thread starter
Location
Up North
Thanks Phil and Keith. Yes following a prototype gives a good indication of what was present at 1:1 scale. David Smith's book in an absolute joy with the information it contains but it can sometimes leave you wondering which option was actually the one you need. A summary chapter outlining 'common practice' would be good - assuming such did actually exist.

Rob
 
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