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TEMPLOT 3D PLUG TRACK - To get up to speed with this experimental project click here.   To watch an introductory video click here.   See the User Guide at Bexhill West.

  • The Plug Track functions are experimental and still being developed. Some of the earlier pages of this topic are now out-of-date.

    For an updated overview of this project see this topic.   For some practical modelling aspects of using Plug Track see Building 3D Track.

    The assumption is that you have your own machines on which to experiment, or helpful friends with machines. Please do not send Templot files to commercial laser cutting or 3D printing firms while this project is still experimental, because the results are unpredictable and possibly wasteful.

    Some pages of this and other topics include contributions from members who are creating and posting their own CAD designs for 3D printing and laser-cutting. Do not confuse them with Templot's own exported CAD files. All files derived from Templot are © Martin Wynne.
  • The Plug Track functions are experimental and still being developed.

    For an updated overview of this project see this topic.   For some practical modelling aspects of using Plug Track see Building 3D Track.

    The assumption is that you have your own machines on which to experiment, or helpful friends with machines. Please do not send Templot files to commercial laser cutting or 3D printing firms while this project is still experimental, because the results are unpredictable and possibly wasteful.

    Some pages of this and other topics include contributions from members who are creating and posting their own CAD designs for 3D printing and laser-cutting. Do not confuse them with Templot's own exported CAD files. All files derived from Templot are © Martin Wynne.

What printer should I get ?

Quick reply >
Only asking as I am not sure if I am a bit too vigorous with the plunging but I find about 20 to 30% of the loose jaws part company with the raft in the process.
@Phil G

Hi Phil,

Which resin? I have found the loose jaws are more firmly attached to the supports when using the water washable ABS-Like resin.

At present I think the break-off neck size is fixed -- I will make it adjustable in the next program update.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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message ref: 9650
@Phil G

Hi Phil,

Which resin? I have found the loose jaws are more firmly attached to the supports when using the water washable ABS-Like resin.

At present I think the break-off neck size is fixed -- I will make it adjustable in the next program update.

cheers,

Martin.
Hi Martin,
still on original Elegoo ABS like as I got 5Kg and to be honest when my 5 Kg of Any-cubic 2 arrived, I found I had ticked the pro version which still requires Isopropanol alcohol so I will be on that for a long time yet.
cheers
Phil
 
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message ref: 9655
Hi Martin,
still on original Elegoo ABS like as I got 5Kg and to be honest when my 5 Kg of Any-cubic 2 arrived, I found I had ticked the pro version which still requires Isopropanol alcohol so I will be on that for a long time yet.
cheers
Phil
@Phil G

Hi Phil,

10kg is a lot of resin -- that's about 100,000 4mm chairs!

Presumably you are planning to make lots of other stuff too?

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9656
@Phil G

Hi Phil,

10kg is a lot of resin -- that's about 100,000 4mm chairs!

Presumably you are planning to make lots of other stuff too?

cheers,

Martin.
:) yes I do more than chairs, All though I have 5K S1 in stock so far, but not the loose jaw keys I quickly found there better if fitted only a day or two after being made. They seem more pliable at that stage, there is only 2 Kg of my first Elegoo 5 kg left, but bit sad I ticked the wrong box for sure
cheers
Phil
 
_______________
message ref: 9657
Martin

Perfect thank you.

I have spent the latter part of the afternoon watching James's videos. The machine is set up and I have a couple of memory cards to jog my mind, I am just about to re-look at your latest release notes regarding the new function of chairs and their rafts.

Out later so making chair files will have to wait till tomorrow. I also need to rescue a bucket from the garden and buy a pastry brush and gloves and pinch a bit of tin foil from the kitchen

I think I will half fill the tray but I need to clean the print/build base as informed, thanks again for your assistance

When are we Zooming again ?

John
@Hayfield

Hi John,

3D printing using water-washable resin on the Alkaid printer:

1. negotiate a cease-fire in the kitchen.

2. shake the bottle of resin well, and leave it to stand for a while for any froth to clear.

3. if cold, run the bottle under the hot tap to warm it up.

4. remove the protection films from both sides of the tank base, and fix it on the printer.

5. remove the protection film (if any) from the build plate, and clean the build surface in hot soapy water before using it for the first time. Rinse and dry it.

6. fix it on the printer. Tighten the top knob firmly. Unlike FDM printing, there is some force involved in resin printing and things can come loose if not tightened firmly.

7. make sure the 4 levelling screws on the build plate are loose and floppy, and switch on.

8. perform the levelling process as explained in the manual and in James's video:

Alkaid video

9. take some time to get this right -- with luck you will only need to do it once. Nip up all 4 screws first, and then tighten them very firmly without disturbing the levelling.

10. exclude all daylight, and then half fill the tank with resin.

11. put the yellow cover on the printer. You can allow daylight while the cover is on.

12. plug in the USB stick containing the CTB print file. On the Alkaid the USB socket is at the back (and upside down). It's a lot easier using one of these:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00DX59EAG

13. use the touch screen to find the file and start the print. While printing some slurping and sucking noises are normal.

14. for 4mm scale chairs it will take about 25 minutes. Leave it dripping for about 5 minutes afterwards.

15. exclude daylight again. Remove the yellow cover and place an old biscuit-tin lid or piece of cardboard over the whole tank area to catch any further drips while removing and handling the build plate. Remove the build plate using the top knob -- don't disturb the levelling screws.

16. swish the build plate in a bowl of warm water. At this stage the chairs are soft and delicate, so don't bump them against the bottom of the bowl. Using a soft brush such as a pastry brush, wash 95% of the surplus resin from the build plate and around the chairs. The water will be significantly contaminated with resin, so don't pour it down the drain, see 25. below.

17. plunge the build plate up and down vigorously in a bucket of warmish water. This is to remove the remaining 5% of resin, and force wash water through the tiny slots for the loose jaws, to ensure there is no surplus resin left in the slots.

18. cover the tank with kitchen foil, and put the yellow cover back on the printer. You can now allow daylight again. Don't allow daylight until the chairs are fully washed.

19. dry the build plate and chairs with a hair dryer, or leave them on the radiator while you have a nice boiled egg and read the latest issue of the Railway Modeller. The chairs must be fully dry before UV curing.

20. examine all the chairs carefully. Make sure none are missing or only partially printed. If so it is bad news -- you will need to clean out the tank and filter the resin to find the missing bits before you can print again. N.B. if loose jaws are missing they may have printed normally and be found detached in the wash water.

21. holding the build plate over a soft landing such as a piece of foam or bubble wrap, gently prise each raft from the build plate using a window scraper. At this stage the chairs are still soft and delicate, so handle them carefully.

22. collect up the rafts and expose them on both sides to UV light using whatever means you have available, until they are fully cured. Depending on the power of the UV this might take 10-20 minutes. Or if using a sunny window cill, several hours.

23. they will harden further over the next few days, and the rafts will very likely curl. The curling doesn't matter, but you can prevent curling by sticking the rafts to a scrap bit of wood with double-stick tape until you are ready to use them.

24. if you won't be using the chairs for several weeks/months, once they are fully cured store them in the dark.

25. the contaminated water from the bowl needs to be left out of doors in a transparent container for several days until the resin content has cured in daylight UV and precipitated to the bottom of the container. The clear water can then be decanted off and used to water the garden. Don't pour it down the drain. The cured resin residue can be disposed of in the domestic waste for landfill.

26. the contamination will be at a low level in a full bucket of water, and it can be disposed of immediately by pouring thinly over the garden. Over time the slight resin content will cure naturally in daylight and become relatively harmless. Some garden plants may even thrive on it! Keep it well away from fish-ponds, pets, etc. Don't pour it down the drain.

27. after building track with these chairs, store it in the dark until you are ready to lay it, or cover it over, until you are ready to paint it. Painting the chairs helps to prevent them becoming brittle from daylight UV exposure in the long term.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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message ref: 9658
Thanks and you have made my wife's year, as she wants me to have blinds on the dens window, looks like printing at night in the short term,

Thanks for the description of the printing process, especially as I did not realize that the print head had to be removed each time, thats why there is a big black knob to loosen the head !!

I was hoping to go out and buy a few bits today, but domestic duties got in the way and the alarm is being serviced this afternoon. So homework and preparation time will be the order of the afternoon

Building a switch rail filing jig (inner left) today. in my hast to get it going before I got on with some DIY, I had two false starts ( the second was not a false start) school boy errors, which in one way is good in that I am sensing what is wright and wrong. Still on a learning curve with the FDM printer but much further along. Plus now I am not starting off afresh with the resin printer as some of the processes seem similar to FDM in the file design phase

Thanks again for all the help and unlike with the FDM printer I am happy to keep soaking up the info before I start, which hopefully will not be long. But what you have written down is a great help for me and hopefully others
 
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message ref: 9659
Martin

I have now printed off those notes firstly as a check list, but the actual process of printing part I will turn into a set of memory prompts

Thank you very much and a great help both for me and hopefully for others, a great set of instructions
 
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message ref: 9660
Hi Martin,
My KPS3 Pro S1 arrived on Wednesday.
So far I have only had time to check the flatness of the underneath of the glass plate.
I placed the edge of a 12" steel rule diagonally across the glass and it does appear to be flat.
Is that a sufficient test?
STeve
 
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message ref: 9690
Hi Martin,
My KPS3 Pro S1 arrived on Wednesday.
So far I have only had time to check the flatness of the underneath of the glass plate.
I placed the edge of a 12" steel rule diagonally across the glass and it does appear to be flat.
Is that a sufficient test?
STeve
@Steve_Cornford

Hi Steve,

Yes I would think so. Mine definitely fails -- it is possible to insert paper at one corner while holding the rule against the glass at the other corner.

I will post the G-code script for the Kingroon Pro S1 perimeter priming shortly. Do you have some PLA-Plus filament?

Have you downloaded the latest Cura? For how to set up a custom printer, see:

https://85a.uk/templot/club/index.php?threads/experimental-plug-track-continued.673/post-7361

cheers,

Martin.
 
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message ref: 9691
Hi Martin,
Yes, I have a reel of ESun pla+ filament.
I also have been to my favourite shop in Hove, Namrick Nut & Bolt Store, to purchase 30mm M6 machine screws, washers and wing nuts, plus the all important 20mm M4 pan-head screw and some nuts as advised.
Unfortunately management has decreed that modelling be suspended whilst we prepare house for influx of visitors for Christmas!
I will have a go at installing Cura & setting up custom profile.
Regards Steve
 
_______________
message ref: 9695
Just recently got my Kingroon KP3S and this is the first attempt at a base.

This is with eSun PLA+ printed at 210 deg C.

Some stringing is clearly evident so I feel some tuning to the profile will be in order.

20231216_180729.jpg


Best regards,

Matt H
 
_______________
message ref: 9699
Just recently got my Kingroon KP3S and this is the first attempt at a base.

This is with eSun PLA+ printed at 210 deg C.

Some stringing is clearly evident so I feel some tuning to the profile will be in order.

View attachment 8129

Best regards,

Matt H
@Matt Harris

Hi Matt,

With eSun filament I prefer 185-190degC after the first layer. Also dropping the bed temperature to 45degC after the first layer. It all helps to avoid stringing, along with 6mm+60mm/sec aggressive retraction.

Also to get accurate socket wall thickness on plain sleepers you will likely need the modified flow equalization.

And concentric bottom pattern infill to avoid weak places in the timbering webs.

My Cura profile including the above attached below. In order to use it you will need to create a custom printer in Cura:

https://85a.uk/templot/club/index.php?threads/experimental-plug-track-continued.673/post-7361

p.s. If using the coated side of a glass bed, you may need to keep the bed at 60degC to ensure the part remains stuck to it.

cheers,

Martin.
 

Attachments

  • kingroon_190_6mmret_45bed.curaprofile
    2.2 KB · Views: 30
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message ref: 9700
@Matt Harris

Hi Matt,

With eSun filament I prefer 185-190degC after the first layer. Also dropping the bed temperature to 45degC after the first layer. It all helps to avoid stringing, along with 6mm+60mm/sec aggressive retraction.

Also to get accurate socket wall thickness on plain sleepers you will likely need the modified flow equalization.

And concentric bottom pattern infill to avoid weak places in the timbering webs.

My Cura profile including the above attached below. In order to use it you will need to create a custom printer in Cura:

https://85a.uk/templot/club/index.php?threads/experimental-plug-track-continued.673/post-7361

p.s. If using the coated side of a glass bed, you may need to keep the bed at 60degC to ensure the part remains stuck to it.

cheers,

Martin.
Thanks Martin - I'm now running off a test print with this profile.

(I did change the bed temp to 55degC for subsequent layers to see how that goes)

Thanks

Matt H
 
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message ref: 9702
Hi Martin,
Do you have any sort of temp probe you could checkout the hot end and the bed? ( given you have 5 or is it now 6 machines)
only asking because I was getting such different results between my Elegoo and my Ender that I wondered how accurate they were at temp reading. To my surprise the answer in my case is not very accurate at all.

On the Elegoo a setting of 190 is actually 202 and on the ender 205 is 200.
The bed is better but still Elegoo set at 55 is reading 60 degrees and the ender at setting 60 is 59 degrees.
Either Elegoo is actually hotter than the set value, and the ender is slightly colder, but maybe a bit closer. or there both wrong.

The values were measured with a digital optical temp device which was also not calibrated, so don't know which if any are actually correct.

I am only mention this as giving temp recommendations needs to be off set with the possibility they can only be guidelines as we can't be 100% sure any two machines are actually reading the same values.
cheers
Phil
Ps I am in no way disagreeing with the basic concept that lower temps do give less stringing. They clearly do.
 
_______________
message ref: 9704
Phil

I have found with my machine 190 is slightly better than 185, but I have the smaller Kingroon

John
 
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message ref: 9708
I am thinking about getting a FDM printer reading though the above I am tempted with the Kingroon or would it be better to spend a bit more money say around £250 and get a Neptune or are there other printers I should look at.
David
 
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message ref: 9720
I have encountered a problem with trying to design and print an A inner rh filing jig. I designed one and printed it from an A6 template once printed it turned out to be a B inner rh jig. Thought I made a mistake so created a 2nd file (changing the name by adding 2 to the title so I did not select the wrong file) After meshing it showed B switch. For design 3 I used a new template after clearing the screen and tried a third time. Same thing happened

What an I doing wrong !!

John
 
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message ref: 9722
Ask around I have an Ender 3 pro that works fine for me. However I did need to get my son-in-law to help with the set up and I can also bounce problems with him as he has the same printer. I know that there will be people out there who will say I have got the wrong printer but it works for me. I also use it for other projects as well.

Keith
 
_______________
message ref: 9723
I have encountered a problem with trying to design and print an A inner rh filing jig. I designed one and printed it from an A6 template once printed it turned out to be a B inner rh jig. Thought I made a mistake so created a 2nd file (changing the name by adding 2 to the title so I did not select the wrong file) After meshing it showed B switch. For design 3 I used a new template after clearing the screen and tried a third time. Same thing happened

What an I doing wrong !!

John
@Hayfield

Hi John,

Have you accidentally clicked the wrong radio button:

john_a_jig.png


The left-hand button creates a jig to match the current control template.

The right-hand button lets you create a filing jig for any switch angle by changing the setting. The default there is 1:32, which is a B switch. An A switch is 1:24.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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message ref: 9724
Hi Phil there is not a one simple answer to the profile. I have set up profiles for various situations. Firstly I in the main use the Prusa slicer but also have Cura downloaded. Martin has made the files available for use for both Track and filing jigs for Cursa. I have transposed Martins settings in to Prusa for Track. When i get around too it I will try to do the same for the filing jigs etc.

As to my FDM printer as with any FDM machine its all about bed levelling. I did struggle for some time but now with a couple of modifications I have near perfect levelling every print. With my son-in-laws help i now have a CR touch fitted and use a PEI plate. With the CR touch once the bed was levelled this now does a 24 point depth test on the bed and automatically compensates for imperfections of the bed this occurs every time the machine is set to print. It is now a case of switch on go for print and walk away. Before you had to watch the first few minutes to ensure everything was OK. The other change is the PEI build plate. This replaces the original magnetic plate and seams to have better adhesion properties. With the Ender you do have to add glue to the build plate for adhesion. The original magnetic plate was also good for adhesion but frequently you had to use a scrapper to remove items. Every time you used the scraper this would affect the levelling. Now with the PEI plate you just wait for the bed to cool down to below 30 degrees and items just pull off with little effort and the levelling remains in place. As I am writing this I have a 3hr 20min print of a DEMU roof printing yet all i did was switch on load the print and come back into the warm for a cup of tea. And yes I did play with the slicer settings as this print is an experiment.

Keith
 
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message ref: 9726
@Hayfield

Hi John,

Have you accidentally clicked the wrong radio button:

View attachment 8154

The left-hand button creates a jig to match the current control template.

The right-hand button lets you create a filing jig for any switch angle by changing the setting. The default there is 1:32, which is a B switch. An A switch is 1:24.

cheers,

Martin.
Martin

Thanks, yes it was ticked and I am hoping it will do it, but its difficult to see whether its an A or B in cura
 
_______________
message ref: 9727
Hi Phil there is not a one simple answer to the profile. I have set up profiles for various situations. Firstly I in the main use the Prusa slicer but also have Cura downloaded. Martin has made the files available for use for both Track and filing jigs for Cursa. I have transposed Martins settings in to Prusa for Track. When i get around too it I will try to do the same for the filing jigs etc.

As to my FDM printer as with any FDM machine its all about bed levelling. I did struggle for some time but now with a couple of modifications I have near perfect levelling every print. With my son-in-laws help i now have a CR touch fitted and use a PEI plate. With the CR touch once the bed was levelled this now does a 24 point depth test on the bed and automatically compensates for imperfections of the bed this occurs every time the machine is set to print. It is now a case of switch on go for print and walk away. Before you had to watch the first few minutes to ensure everything was OK. The other change is the PEI build plate. This replaces the original magnetic plate and seams to have better adhesion properties. With the Ender you do have to add glue to the build plate for adhesion. The original magnetic plate was also good for adhesion but frequently you had to use a scrapper to remove items. Every time you used the scraper this would affect the levelling. Now with the PEI plate you just wait for the bed to cool down to below 30 degrees and items just pull off with little effort and the levelling remains in place. As I am writing this I have a 3hr 20min print of a DEMU roof printing yet all i did was switch on load the print and come back into the warm for a cup of tea. And yes I did play with the slicer settings as this print is an experiment.

Keith
Hi Keith,
I tend to agree with everything you have said, and to be honest there the key advantages you get with the Neptune 3 pro as standard.
Do you have a single Z leadscrew as fitted? I fitted a second one, and to be honest I now think that made it a bit worse if anything.
The Neptune also has two lead screws on the the Z, but importantly its also has a toothed belt ensuring they micro step together. (I found a clone of this belt arrangements on AliExpress, so we will see when it gets to me if its any good on the ender or not.)
which if you watch the timing belt on the Neptune closely, you can see there slightly moving all the time.
Its not helped with me breaking the ender hot end as well, that's fixed now though. A good thing about enders there lots of replacement parts readily to hand.

re slicers I am pondering weather to have a dabble with Orca slicer, its getting some very good reviews, it seems to be fork on top of a fork from the Prusa slicer. supposed to have all the advantages claimed of Prusa, but also all the ease of loading new machines settings and profiles, you get with Cura, so they say. Have you head of it?
cheers
Phil
 
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message ref: 9728
but its difficult to see whether its an A or B in cura

Hi John,
If you use the scroll wheel on the mouse in Cura you can zoom right in, then hold down the right mouse button and you can orbit. By using a combination of both you can get right in and read the legend printed on the item
as per photo attached
cheers
Phil

Attachments​

  • close up of B switch.jpg
    close up of B switch.jpg
    186.1 KB · Views: 0
 
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message ref: 9730
Martin

Thanks, yes it was ticked and I am hoping it will do it, but its difficult to see whether its an A or B in cura
@Hayfield

Hi John,

After clicking Slice in Cura, click Preview at the top of the screen:


blade_jig_in_cura.png



Then on the menus click View > Camera position > Top view. Roll the mouse wheel if you need to zoom in.

You can then read the size of blade quite easily. Above is an A blade jig. Below is a B blade jig:


blade_jig_in_cura1.png



I'm sorry it isn't clearer. I tried for ages to get a clearer way of showing the sizes, but you have to bear in mind that the jigs can be created for any switch angle, not just the limited range of REA switches. FDM printing isn't good for text.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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message ref: 9732
Thank you both, I am just finishing printing the A switch rh front, I just need a B switch lh front to complete both sets.

The problem was that I had difficulty reading the jigs and if I enlarged them the writing went behind a dialog box, another learning experiance
 
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message ref: 9738
The problem was that I had difficulty reading the jigs and if I enlarged them the writing went behind a dialog box, another learning experiance
@Hayfield

Hi John,

If you mean in Cura, you can move the image around from behind other things by holding down the mouse wheel and moving the mouse.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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message ref: 9739
Appologies for going off topic

A couple of comments on RMweb were on the lines of once you build the track, what do you do with the printers

Well a contact asked about how big a piece could you build on my little Kingroon, he sent me one file of an 183mm long model of a station waiting room and a short test piece. Firstly would it fit on my Kingroon with 180mm square bed, I had no idea what to do other than first mesh fix the file then import it in Cura, as I knew it would tell you when it would not fit on the bed

Well at 183mm it did not, but I remembered how we printed an oversize item diagonally (I do listen in class). Firstly I stood it upright from laying on its back by turning it 90 degrees, then I turned it 45 degrees diagonally and it fitted on the build plate. However the complete model (less roof) would take13 hours and 18 mins to print and use 138 grams of filament. So I thought about printing the much smaller test piece I was sent

Again the drawing was on its back and I thought I doubt if could could be printed that way round owing to the 2 rear protrusions. So with the file in in Cura after a bit of fiddling I managed to get it upright and thought I would use the jig settings as it was much the same size as a jig side

72.jpeg


It started printing fine and was due to take 1hr 39 mins and use 15 grams of filament (30p) this is it at 50%

73.jpeg


At 75% and I was wondering how it would fair when it got to the top of the door and windows, would they droop

74.jpeg
At 100% and 2 hrs and 9 mins

Well it printed and I have got the answer to the persons question, "what to do with the printers once the track is built" simple carry on building other things !!!

OK someone designed the test piece, and I lucked out first time printing it without really knowing what I was doing, another great tool at our disposal
 
_______________
message ref: 9746
Appologies for going off topic

A couple of comments on RMweb were on the lines of once you build the track, what do you do with the printers

Well a contact asked about how big a piece could you build on my little Kingroon, he sent me one file of an 183mm long model of a station waiting room and a short test piece. Firstly would it fit on my Kingroon with 180mm square bed, I had no idea what to do other than first mesh fix the file then import it in Cura, as I knew it would tell you when it would not fit on the bed

Well at 183mm it did not, but I remembered how we printed an oversize item diagonally (I do listen in class). Firstly I stood it upright from laying on its back by turning it 90 degrees, then I turned it 45 degrees diagonally and it fitted on the build plate. However the complete model (less roof) would take13 hours and 18 mins to print and use 138 grams of filament. So I thought about printing the much smaller test piece I was sent

Again the drawing was on its back and I thought I doubt if could could be printed that way round owing to the 2 rear protrusions. So with the file in in Cura after a bit of fiddling I managed to get it upright and thought I would use the jig settings as it was much the same size as a jig side

View attachment 8166

It started printing fine and was due to take 1hr 39 mins and use 15 grams of filament (30p) this is it at 50%

View attachment 8167

At 75% and I was wondering how it would fair when it got to the top of the door and windows, would they droop

View attachment 8168 At 100% and 2 hrs and 9 mins

Well it printed and I have got the answer to the persons question, "what to do with the printers once the track is built" simple carry on building other things !!!

OK someone designed the test piece, and I lucked out first time printing it without really knowing what I was doing, another great tool at our disposal
You must have a wonder printer. You don't seem to have any visible layers at all.
By the way the the answer to drooping at gaps, IE doors and windows is supports. That's a whole new world of Cura settings for you.
also you don't need to print the whole thing in one go if it will not fit on your bed.
 
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message ref: 9747
Martin

Thanks, yes it was ticked and I am hoping it will do it, but its difficult to see whether its an A or B in cura
@Hayfield

Hi John,

I have rearranged some code so that this dialog can now show the size of the jig before you create it, and can be cancelled if wrong:


jig_create_confirm.png


jig_create_confirm1.png



Will be in the next program update.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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message ref: 9748
Thanks that will be of a great help, I dont know how I unknowing changed the settings, but I nearly have a set of B filing jigs which is no bad thing
 
_______________
message ref: 9754
You must have a wonder printer. You don't seem to have any visible layers at all.
By the way the the answer to drooping at gaps, IE doors and windows is supports. That's a whole new world of Cura settings for you.
also you don't need to print the whole thing in one go if it will not fit on your bed.

Its the small Kingroon printer and as I said I had no idea what I was doing other than using the methods Martin and the rest of you have shown me, plus the design skills of David
 
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message ref: 9757
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