Templot Club forums powered for Martin Wynne by XenForo :

TEMPLOT 3D PLUG TRACK - To get up to speed with this experimental project click here.   To watch an introductory video click here.   See the User Guide at Bexhill West.

  • The Plug Track functions are experimental and still being developed. Some of the earlier pages of this topic are now out-of-date.

    For an updated overview of this project see this topic.   For some practical modelling aspects of using Plug Track see Building 3D Track.

    The assumption is that you have your own machines on which to experiment, or helpful friends with machines. Please do not send Templot files to commercial laser cutting or 3D printing firms while this project is still experimental, because the results are unpredictable and possibly wasteful.

    Some pages of this and other topics include contributions from members who are creating and posting their own CAD designs for 3D printing and laser-cutting. Do not confuse them with Templot's own exported CAD files. All files derived from Templot are © Martin Wynne.
  • The Plug Track functions are experimental and still being developed.

    For an updated overview of this project see this topic.   For some practical modelling aspects of using Plug Track see Building 3D Track.

    The assumption is that you have your own machines on which to experiment, or helpful friends with machines. Please do not send Templot files to commercial laser cutting or 3D printing firms while this project is still experimental, because the results are unpredictable and possibly wasteful.

    Some pages of this and other topics include contributions from members who are creating and posting their own CAD designs for 3D printing and laser-cutting. Do not confuse them with Templot's own exported CAD files. All files derived from Templot are © Martin Wynne.

What printer should I get ?

Quick reply >
57.jpeg


Yesterdays printing was successful

58.jpeg


Used in anger this afternoon

59.jpeg


Finished switch rail back
 
_______________
message ref: 9545
Hi Martin,
An update on my Kingroon KPS3 Pro S1 order.

Yesterday I received an email inviting me to pay an additional 80 USD in order to receive a KPS3 Pro S2!
I replied pointing out that I had already paid an extra 30 USD in response to their offer of shipping a KPS3 Pro S1 from China, and that if they could not supply a KPS3 Pro S1 could they refund my money so that I could source from elsewhere.
Today they sent me a message stating that they were refunding both the 169 USD and the 30 USD.

I have now ordered a Kingroon KPS3 Pro S1 from Altwaylab in the uk for the princely sum of £180.00 including tax and shipping.

https://altwaylab.co.uk/products/official-kingroon-kp3s-pro-s1-3d-printer

Steve
 
_______________
message ref: 9549
@Steve_Cornford

Hi Steve,

Many thanks for finding that. Now ordered one, on a proper web site with contact details:

Company Details:
  • Company Name: ALTWAY (UK) LIMITED
  • Company Address: Unit 2, Mansfield i-Centre Oakham Business Park, Hamilton Way, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, NG18 5BR, United Kingdom
  • Company Number: 08505518
  • VAT: GB163396393
Contact Information:

I will now attempt to cancel my existing order on Kingroon and get a refund.

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9550
@Steve_Cornford

Hi Steve,

What a difference! Message from Altway says order packed and ready to be picked up by DPD. Tracking number provided.

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9568
@Steve_Cornford @Hayfield

Hi Steve,

Kingroon printer Pro S1 now arrived!

Altway can't be faulted -- ordered Thursday evening with free postage, arrived Saturday morning. What a contrast with Kingroon's own web site.

It is the Pro S1 version. Just a tiny sticker on the box saying so. It's great that this version is at long last available in the UK, because it seems to be the ideal beginner FDM printer for plug track bases. However, it seems to be no longer in production, Kingroon are pushing the more expensive S2 Klipper version. So when the present stock is exhausted there may not be any more.

Compared with John's Kingroon version, the changes are

printing area 200mm x 200mm (instead of 180mm x 180mm)
glass bed fitted
belt tensioners
linear guide on Z-axis (instead of rollers)
double linear guides on Y-axis (instead of single)
filament break detector
integrated power supply (instead of separate)

However, the poor-quality supplied instruction leaflet is for the Pro (non-S1) version, including instructions for adjusting the non-existent Y-axis rollers! Likewise the pictures on the box.

Mine is still in the packaging. It will have to stay there until I can use both hands for assembly.

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9580
Hi Martin,
Glad you are pleased with your purchase.

Mine should arrive Wednesday as spoke with them & deferred shipment until Tuesday, as presently down in Devon visiting grandchildren.
Looks like you were right about the glass bed then!
Let us hope you make steady progress healing.
Steve
 
_______________
message ref: 9581
Hi guys
Quick photo to show the difference on the jig made on the Ender 3 pro (with upgrades) and the stock Elegoo Neptune 3 Pro out of the box. Chalk and cheese. The Ender is ok for FDM timbers but not good enough for accurate jigs.
for Jigs I have to recommend, on my testing anyway. The Neptune 3 pro every time. Having made 8 jigs on the Neptune now I can confirm original rail settings work from a B switch to and E switch (that being the biggest I can get on the bed) such a different story to the nightmare that was the ender 3

ender 3 vs Nepturn 3 2.jpg


ender3 vs neptune 3 1.jpg


cheers
Phil
 
_______________
message ref: 9591
Hi guys
Quick photo to show the difference on the jig made on the Ender 3 pro (with upgrades) and the stock Elegoo Neptune 3 Pro out of the box. Chalk and cheese. The Ender is ok for FDM timbers but not good enough for accurate jigs.
for Jigs I have to recommend, on my testing anyway. The Neptune 3 pro every time. Having made 8 jigs on the Neptune now I can confirm original rail settings work from a B switch to and E switch (that being the biggest I can get on the bed) such a different story to the nightmare that was the ender 3
cheers
Phil
Interesting comparison Phil. I have just got the Neptune 4 Pro, although its still boxed until I finish work an have time to investigate, but it will be interesting to compare what I get from it, against your N3P images.

Richie
 
_______________
message ref: 9593
Just to clarify B to E is 4 switch sizes all back filing jigs completed now working on the front right and left filing Jigs so 12 jigs in all required, I may even do an A size set just for the fun of it. Still working out how to get the F size made.
cheers
Phil,
Alls well that Enders well!

And how were the meatballs?
well I liked them more then the Ender that's for sure :)
cheers
Phil
 
_______________
message ref: 9594
Interesting comparison Phil. I have just got the Neptune 4 Pro, although its still boxed until I finish work an have time to investigate, but it will be interesting to compare what I get from it, against your N3P images.

Richie
Hi Richie,
The tan jigs are made with Sunlu PLA + and the black ones are Esun PLA+ on the ender.
I have subsequently discovered a combination of Esun on the Neptune is by far the best combination.
Sunlu on the ender will not even stay on the bed, on the Neptune its ok, it works but the Esun defiantly gives the better definition. There is quite a lot to fine tuning the machines to get the best out of them.
cheers
Phil,
 
_______________
message ref: 9595
Mine is still in the packaging. It will have to stay there until I can use both hands for assembly.
@Steve_Cornford @James Walters

No-one believed it would stay there for long! :) I managed to get it assembled and running, although it took a while with one gammy arm:


kingroon_pro_s1.jpg



Needless to say I disregarded all the supplied software and settings, and turned the bed over to use the plain glass side with a glue-stick. The supplied instruction leaflet is next to useless, so I disregarded that too. It's actually for the wrong printer.

I set up a custom printer in Cura in order to use my usual profiles, and levelled the bed using a priming perimeter run in my usual way.

The first test piece is excellent, easily a match for the best from the Neptune, so I'm well pleased.

The actual bed is in fact 210mm x 210mm. But the supplied bed clips are larger than they needed to be, requiring 8mm to clear. So the actual usable area is 210mm x 194mm. You could gain an extra mm or two by using ordinary foldback clips instead of the supplied clips. The bed clears the Z-column by the skin of its teeth, so you wouldn't want the clips on the side of the bed, they need to be front and back. Don't put the left-hand front one too close to the corner, or it will interfere with the nozzle when homing. On the other hand, put the left-hand back one as close to the corner as possible, otherwise it will conflict with the bed heater cable connector.

If I'm suggesting this as the ideal beginner's FDM printer for plug track, which at £180 post free I think it is, I suppose I shall have to write up all these assembly and usage instructions to replace the useless ones supplied. For example, unless you know to loosely assemble the M4 T-nuts (labelled M3 in the instructions) in the support block before inserting the column, getting them fixed afterwards will take you hours. No mention of this in the instructions. So lots more writing and explanations to do.

If James does a review of this printer, presumably he would have to follow the instructions supplied -- in which case good luck, and don't expect the resulting timbering bases to be much good. :(

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9597
If James does a review of this printer, presumably he would have to follow the instructions supplied -- in which case good luck, and don't expect the resulting timbering bases to be much good. :(
Hi Martin,
I accidently picked upon a few reviews of Kingroon printers on YouTube today, whilst looking for something else. The most common theme was overwhelmingly "don't even bother taking the instructions out of the box".
So anybody doing a Kingroon review, should not be worried about being honest about this weakness. Everybody else does nor seem to hold back that's for sure :)
cheers
Phil,
 
_______________
message ref: 9598
@Steve_Cornford

A disappointment with the Kingroon Pro S1. The supplied glass bed is not dead flat. It is convex on the plain glass side by about 0.15mm (6 thou) in the centre relative to the corners. This makes it impossible to create timbering bases of constant thickness.

I don't know if this is my one-off bad luck, or if it is warping caused by the process of applying the carborundum matrix to one side, and they will all be the same.

The solution is simple -- use a different glass bed. But that rather detracts from the concept of this being an ideal beginner's FDM printer, and it adds to the cost.

Fortunately the cantilever design allows any over-size glass bed to be used, so it is not difficult find one which fits.

In my case I simply borrowed the glass bed which I use on the Neptune 2S, which is a dead flat borosilicate glass bed obtained from:

https://ooznest.co.uk/product/borosilicate-glass-build-plate/

The advantage of being dead flat is that it doesn't require any clips. It can be attached to the bed plate using ordinary glass stiction with a thin film of soapy water. There is no force involved in FDM printing, so this works fine and in fact it can be quite difficult to remove. This makes it possible to use the full 210mm x 210mm build area. edit: requires firmware mod.


Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9605
Hi Martin,
I should receive mine on Wednesday so will check the plain glass side.
When I ordered (both times) a glass bed was not mentioned although as you pointed out the illustration did seem to show a thick glass bed.
If convex I will order the borosilicate that you have provided a link to.

Apart from that it sounds like the printer is OK?
Steve
 
_______________
message ref: 9607
Hi Richie,
The tan jigs are made with Sunlu PLA + and the black ones are Esun PLA+ on the ender.
I have subsequently discovered a combination of Esun on the Neptune is by far the best combination.
Sunlu on the ender will not even stay on the bed, on the Neptune its ok, it works but the Esun defiantly gives the better definition. There is quite a lot to fine tuning the machines to get the best out of them.
cheers
Phil,
Thanks Phil,
It's the eSun PLA+ I have got following Martin's recommendation, so I'll let you know when I get there. I am probably about a week off being able to have an afternoon to put to one side to get it out, build it and start playing!
Richie
 
_______________
message ref: 9613
Apart from that it sounds like the printer is OK?
@Steve_Cornford @Hayfield

Hi Steve,

The Kingroon extruder is excellent -- better for plug track than any others I have here, including the Neptune 3 Plus. I now have 2 of them, so the first one wasn't a fluke, they are both the same. Unlike the Neptune, it accepts aggressive 6mm at 60mm/sec retraction, producing with eSun PLA-Plus filament accurate clean square chair sockets with no stringing or zits in the corners. (The Sunlu/Jayo filament is a bit more stringy on all printers.)

So I'm happy to suggest a Kingroon printer as an ideal first printer for an FDM beginner. The cantilever design produces much better Z-accuracy than the low-cost double-column printers with a single-sided Z-screw, and takes up a lot less bench space.

What I'm in two minds about, is whether I prefer the Pro S1 over the smaller lower-cost KP3S 3.0 which John has:

https://altwaylab.co.uk/collections...ingroon-kp3s-3-0-3d-printer-with-meanwell-psu

I now have both here, so I can make a direct comparison.

On paper it's a no-brainer, which is why I ordered the Pro S1. In practice I'm not so sure, despite the obvious advantage of the larger 200mm x 200mm work area. There are several niggles with the Pro S1 which don't affect the smaller version:

○ The X-axis toothed belt is now below the guide rail instead of above it. The result is that the crimped ends hang so low that they collide with the bed clips, and almost hit the part being printed. It's not easy to do anything about this.

○ The double Y-axis guide rails should produce a more stable bed. But only if they are exactly parallel and level. In practice I detected some stiffness at one end of the travel, so I slacked off all the rail fixing screws and nipped them back up gently while moving the bed to and fro. I got it moving more freely in the end, but this hardly makes it a beginners printer. The single rail in the smaller printer runs perfectly smooth and square straight out of the box.

○ The Z-axis limit screw is too long (25mm). Unlike on the smaller printer it locates in a blind threaded bush. It has to be blind because directly below it in the base of this version is the stepper motor. This made it very difficult to screw it down far enough to ensure adequate compression of the bed support springs. I replaced it and its spring with a 20mm panhead M4 screw and lock-nut. Which does a much better job and is easily adjustable to the required height -- I settled on 27mm from the base to the top of the screw.

○ As supplied the X-axis belt was slack -- easily fixed with the tension adjuster, but there is no mention of this in the instructions. The smaller printer doesn't have adjusters, but arrives with the belts already tensioned ready for use.

○ My glass bed was not dead flat, although this may have been a one-off. The smaller printer has a flexible plastic bed.

The filament-break detector is strangely positioned and will work only with the supplied reel rollers on the bench. I prefer to hang the filament reel on the wall behind the printer, so the break detector was unusable. I fooled it with a short length of filament through it. The smaller printer doesn't have a break detector. In practice using PLA-Plus filament I have never had a filament break on any printer, sometimes running many hours, so I'm not too worried about this.

So which printer to suggest? John has shown that it's possible to do good work in 180mm x 180mm, although there's no doubt that the extra 20mm each way is worth having. It is actually 210mm x 210mm bed size, but to use the full area would require a mod to the firmware settings.

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9617
I ordered a KP3S Pro S1 directly from Kingroon. It took them a week to reply to each of my emails and after a month of delayed conversation they eventually admitted:
I’m sorry that the KP3S Pro S1 Printer in our local Warehouse is stop production
I'm still waiting for them to confirm that my order has actually been cancelled but it has only been 5 days so I'm not due a reply from them for a few days yet... :(
 
_______________
message ref: 9619
I ordered a KP3S Pro S1 directly from Kingroon. It took them a week to reply to each of my emails and after a month of delayed conversation they eventually admitted:

I'm still waiting for them to confirm that my order has actually been cancelled but it has only been 5 days so I'm not due a reply from them for a few days yet... :(
@S-Club-7

Hi David,

After a month with no contact, Kingroon suggested that I pay them an extra $100 for the S2 printer instead, and shipping from USA. I replied in the negative and they agreed to refund my original payment within 7 days. No sign of it yet after 4 days. If not received I shall start the dispute process on Paypal.

In contrast Altway in the UK can't be faulted. Full progress emails with tracking information and next-day delivery by DPD. But I suspect only while stocks last.

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9621
@Steve_Cornford

Hi Steve,

Some notes on assembling the S1 which you won't find in the instructions. :)

1. the very first thing to do is to find the little plastic bag with 2 screws and T-nuts. Assemble them loosely (with the T-nuts the right way round) into the small column support block behind the Z-stepper motor shaft.

2. before you start handling the column, tie the Z-carriage about half-way up the column with string. If you don't do this it will crash up and down the column while you are handling it. I suggest slackening one of the screws in the top plate on the column so that you can twist the string round it. Don't tie it too far up, or you won't have sufficient flexibility in the cable loom while handling the column.

3. when dropping the column into place in the base, waggle the slots over the loose T-nuts which you inserted at 1.

4. supplied are 3 long screws and 3 short screws. You need only 2 of each, the others are spares.

5. the 2 long ones screw into the column from the back of the base. the 2 short ones screw into the column from below. Nip up all 4 first, and then finally fully tighten all of them.

6. you can then tighten the screws in the T-nuts. They are fiddly to get at with the Allen key -- move the bed fully forward.

7. drop in the long Z-lift screw from above. It will likely fall with its own weight through the brass nut on the Z-carriage. Locate it in the coupler on the Z-stepper motor shaft, when fully home it will be flush with the top plate on the column. Tighten the 2 grub screws in the coupler very firmly -- not easy with the fiddly little Allen key made of cheese. There is plenty of room round the coupler for full cap-head screws instead of grub screws -- if I have any problems I shall change them.

8. you can now untie the string from the Z-carriage. It can be easily raised and lowered manually by twiddling the Z-screw in your fingers.

9. check the tension on both toothed belts. They should "twang" when plucked. Use the adjuster knobs as necessary.

10. if you intend to use the filament-break detector, the blue bowden tube fits between the top of the break detector and the extruder. To fit it in the detector, push down on the plastic ring while inserting the tube in the fitting. The other end is a push fit in the extruder. If not using the detector it will need to be fooled with a short length of filament pushed through it to depress the micro switch.

11. for initial levelling I use the paper method at each corner. I prefer to do it without power, moving the bed and extruder head manually. To do this first gently lower the Z-carriage by twiddling the Z-lift screw until you just hear the Z-limit switch go click as it contacts the Z-limit adjusting screw in front of the Z-coupler. (The spring doesn't move, it is to prevent the screw turning.)

12. after adjusting the 4 yellow wheels for slight drag on the paper at each corner, check that the bed support springs are adequately compressed. There needs to be at least 2-3mm of screw projecting below each yellow wheel. If not, you will need to adjust the Z-limit screw lower. I found that difficult to do and replaced it with a shorter panhead M4 screw and lock-nut. Alternatively you could shorten the existing screw by 2-3mm. Lower the Z-carriage again until you hear the click, and repeat the paper levelling.

13. discard and ignore the supplied software and settings on the microSD card in the USB adaptor. Download a full up-to-date version of Cura from:

https://ultimaker.com/software/ultimaker-cura/#downloads

You probably want the Win64.exe installer.

14. to use my suggested custom profile for the timbering bases, you will need to create a custom printer in Cura. The final levelling is done by measuring the thickness of the perimeter priming run at each corner. All this was explained with John in one of the Zoom meetings, and also previously on here with Phil G.

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9622
@S-Club-7

Hi David,

After a month with no contact, Kingroon suggested that I pay them an extra $100 for the S2 printer instead, and shipping from USA. I replied in the negative and they agreed to refund my original payment within 7 days. No sign of it yet after 4 days. If not received I shall start the dispute process on Paypal.

In contrast Altway in the UK can't be faulted. Full progress emails with tracking information and next-day delivery by DPD. But I suspect only while stocks last.

cheers,

Martin.

I am probably teaching everyone what they always know, when buying items mail order I like to surround myself with as much protection as possible, both in payment protection and guarantee. In some cases it involves paying a bit more,

I paid extra for my FDM printer and brought it from Amazon, it arrived in a day or so. I paid using Visa so I have a double protection on both receiving it and if anything goes wrong I have a contract with both VISA and Amazon to fall back on.

As for the guarantee, as I told Currys salesman when declining the 2 year warranty extension for my laptop, the sales of goods act protects me against faults for a reasonable time, with the 3D printer and computer this is well past the first 12 months, both of which my claim is against my bank where I obtained my credit card if the supplier defaults. Between Visa and Currys or Amazon my items are guaranteed well past 12 mths

OK I paid a bit more but so far had no hassle with either printer, I think buying either direct from China may reduce my consumer protection. I was relieved to find my resin printer came from Northampton despite having to pay in USD.
 
_______________
message ref: 9629
I am probably teaching everyone what they always know, when buying items mail order I like to surround myself with as much protection as possible, both in payment protection and guarantee. In some cases it involves paying a bit more,

I paid extra for my FDM printer and brought it from Amazon, it arrived in a day or so. I paid using Visa so I have a double protection on both receiving it and if anything goes wrong I have a contract with both VISA and Amazon to fall back on.

As for the guarantee, as I told Currys salesman when declining the 2 year warranty extension for my laptop, the sales of goods act protects me against faults for a reasonable time, with the 3D printer and computer this is well past the first 12 months, both of which my claim is against my bank where I obtained my credit card if the supplier defaults. Between Visa and Currys or Amazon my items are guaranteed well past 12 mths

OK I paid a bit more but so far had no hassle with either printer, I think buying either direct from China may reduce my consumer protection. I was relieved to find my resin printer came from Northampton despite having to pay in USD.
Hi John,
I find my problem it not so much not getting the items. Its more about making them work properly when I have them :)
can you suggest some protection for that :)
cheers
Phil.
 
_______________
message ref: 9630
_______________
message ref: 9631
13. discard and ignore the supplied software and settings on the microSD card in the USB adaptor.
@Steve_Cornford @Hayfield

Hi Steve,

I have since discovered that the USB adaptor/card supplied with my printer is faulty and unusable.

If yours is the same, and you don't have another microSD card you can use, you can drive the printer directly from Cura over the supplied USB cable (if you can get your laptop close to the printer).

To do that, you may need to install the USB coms driver. I have uploaded a copy of that for you at:

https://85a.uk/odds/DRVSETUP64.exe

If you have a recent version of Windows it may be already installed.

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9633
Hi John,

Strange. I paid in pounds and mine came from Leicester.

Perhaps this is the reason Northampton has gone over to US dollars: :)

https://citizen-network.org/library/why-northamptonshire-went-bust.html

cheers,

Martin.
Martin

Sorry my Alkaid did come from Leicester, bad memory but was paid in USD and I got an extra charge on my credit card (they are getting back some of the free interest my credit card gives me by paying the bill in full and of course the product insurance that comes with credit cards)
 
_______________
message ref: 9634
@Steve_Cornford @Hayfield

Hi Steve,

So which printer to suggest? John has shown that it's possible to do good work in 180mm x 180mm, although there's no doubt that the extra 20mm each way is worth having. It is actually 210mm x 210mm bed size, but to use the full area would require a mod to the firmware settings.

cheers,

Martin.

For an old codger and technophobe its perfect

Watching two or three other videos on YouTube helped, as did the coaching from Martin.
The glass plate is much easier to level and has needed no further adjustments
Martins small sleeper test file was a godsend (have you got one for chairs using the Alkaid please)

And to a certain extent I have gone off piste with some test shots for 0-16.5 and 00e (12mm gauge) turnout bases. Which proves the ease of use in altering the settings in plug track

I have a few memory cards which I did find useful as prompts, whilst I got used to the method of making print files and printing process.

But to date I can recommend this printer, for a short bit I thought I may have jumped the gun and perhaps got the bigger printer, but seeing the extra skill needed to set it up I am relieved to have this one
 
_______________
message ref: 9635
@Steve_Cornford @Hayfield

How to break the Z-limit screw on the S1, put the clips in the wrong place, and get in a complete muddle with the levelling and different filaments:




I suggest stay with using PLA-Plus on these inexpensive printers. If you want to experiment with other polymers, and polymers filled with glitter and other materials, it might be better to get a more expensive printer in the first place.

Also the poor positioning of the filament break detector is very obvious. I didn't even bother to try it, or the blue bowden tube. (It's not fitted on the smaller printer.)

For the spring adjuster on the extruder, I left it as supplied turned fully clockwise. To feed the filament manually, turn the gear wheel with your fingers -- much easier then using the screen controls. Squeeze the lever to free the gears while inserting the filament.

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9637
Martins small sleeper test file was a godsend (have you got one for chairs using the Alkaid please)
@Hayfield

Hi John,

This file contains a mix of 150 S1 chairs in 4mm scale. Some with slots, some loose jaws for them, some solid slide-on chairs:

s1_mixed.png


This file is ready to use on the Alkaid printer, already sliced. Just copy it onto a USB stick and plug into the printer. Will take about 25 minutes to print.

For ABS-Like resin.

When washing, plunge it vigorously in the bucket of water to ensure the slots are washed through.

p.s. sorry not tested -- it's difficult to do any printing one-handed.

cheers,

Martin.
 

Attachments

  • ALK_s1_mixed_4mm_fixed.ctb
    7.2 MB · Views: 34
_______________
message ref: 9640
Martin

Perfect thank you.

I have spent the latter part of the afternoon watching James's videos. The machine is set up and I have a couple of memory cards to jog my mind, I am just about to re-look at your latest release notes regarding the new function of chairs and their rafts.

Out later so making chair files will have to wait till tomorrow. I also need to rescue a bucket from the garden and buy a pastry brush and gloves and pinch a bit of tin foil from the kitchen

I think I will half fill the tray but I need to clean the print/build base as informed, thanks again for your assistance

When are we Zooming again ?

John
 
_______________
message ref: 9642
I am so sorry but I have been looking for the updated instructions for making multiple chairs in the new dialog box.

I have spent ages going through plug track threads, but I just cannot find them. I have watched James's video but its been updated since filming
 
_______________
message ref: 9643
@Hayfield

Hi John,

This recent scruff video clip shows how to make rafts of chairs in 7mm. For 4mm don't change the 15 to 8, leave it on 15:

https://flashbackconnect.com/Default.aspx?id=_LWLPBa47zf9Evgw0wwnkQ2

I explained about making chair rafts for check rail chairs in the last Zoom meeting. The recording is here:

https://85a.uk/templot/club/index.php?threads/scruff-zoom-recordings.643/post-9464

I'm sorry, I can no longer keep track of everything and remember where it is. I know I've explained it all several times. We can do another Zoom meeting to get you started if you say a time.

cheers,

Martin.
 
_______________
message ref: 9644
Hi John,
If you do print the STL raft Martin posted can you please let me know if most of the loose jaws survive the vigorous washing and plunging Martin rightly says is required.
Only asking as I am not sure if I am a bit too vigorous with the plunging but I find about 20 to 30% of the loose jaws part company with the raft in the process. I never blocked slots though :)
cheers
Phil
 
_______________
message ref: 9648
Ps my solution is print rafts and jaws separately as that way I can control the wash rate required
works well for all premade chair raft combinations, not so good for speciality rafts though.
cheers
Phil
 
_______________
message ref: 9649
Back
Top