• The Plug Track functions are experimental and still being developed. Some of the earlier pages of this topic are now out-of-date.

    Some pages of this topic include contributions from members who are creating and posting their own CAD designs for 3D printing and laser-cutting. Do not confuse them with Templot's own exported CAD files.

Rail section settings (bullhead)

Martin Wynne

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A simplified bullhead rail section is used programmatically in Plug Track. This is how it is dimensioned:

custom_rail_section_dims.png


The data is stored internally in equivalent full-size prototype inches. When shown in the custom dimensioning dialog above it is converted to model mm at the current model scale set on the control template. It is important therefore to have set your model scale before entering your rail section measurements in mm.

"Programmatic" means that the data will be rescaled to the current model scale. So a 7mm/ft scale rail will appear scaled down if specified for 4mm/ft track, for example. This is important if you will be using rail from a different scale for narrow-gauge, light railways, etc. Set the actual model scale you are using, and enter the actual measurements of the rail as a custom setting. Do not click one of the pre-set rail sizes.

n.b. If the rail head width B does not match the template setting at real > rails > rail section data ... , the template will be modified accordingly and rebuilt before being exported in DXF/STL files. Take care to enter a sensible dimension for B otherwise your templates may become unusable. You may want to save a backup BOX file before experimenting.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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Location
Sandbach, Cheshire
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Builder of Finescale Signals in 2mm scale to 7mm scale, Trackwork, Turnouts and Layouts.
OK another annoying question is going round in my head. Why fish? what have they got to do with it in relation to rail profiles, I mean why fish angle or plate come to that? Why has something that swims under water got anything to do with it?

OK I'll just get my coat....
 
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Martin Wynne

Admin
Thread starter
Location
West of the Severn UK
Info
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Enjoy using Templot?
Thanks.

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add
helpful replies.
OK another annoying question is going round in my head. Why fish? what have they got to do with it in relation to rail profiles, I mean why fish angle or plate come to that? Why has something that swims under water got anything to do with it?
@Stephen Freeman

from French: :)

fiche: a structural piece used for support, a diagonal brace, a wedge

ficher: to plug, press, force, drive something into place

Tightening the fishbolts forces the fishplate into the fish angles, putting the rail web under tension load. The load has to be sufficient not to become unloaded under rolling traffic, otherwise the fishbolts would work loose:

index.php


Note that when fishplates are working properly, there is a space behind them. When they become worn, packing strips are sometimes inserted in the fish angles to restore the rear space.

Martin.
 
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Sandbach, Cheshire
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Builder of Finescale Signals in 2mm scale to 7mm scale, Trackwork, Turnouts and Layouts.
Fair enough, but just exactly how did the French language get involved? I have heard it said that English is 70% French with Germanic structure. We use the word microfiche so why did we not just use fiche anyway, it's probably in the English language anyway.
 
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Derek

Member
Location
UK, Midlands
Fair enough, but just exactly how did the French language get involved? I have heard it said that English is 70% French with Germanic structure. We use the word microfiche so why did we not just use fiche anyway, it's probably in the English language anyway.
You have to think about the way speak and remember that 200 years ago a fair percentage of people couldn't read or write.

I would suggest that Britain's maritime history probably illustrates this the best way: Why do we say 'landlubber' when clearly we mean 'land lover'? Why is the bow of a ship often referred to as the fo'csl (spelling and apostrophe can vary) when clearly we mean the Fore Castle (from the early days of sailing warships). Gunnals/gunnels being gun walls (interestingly it morphed into ginnell, which is a term for narrow walkways between buildings.

The way languages evolve is fascinating: If you want to measure the depth of water below a ship's keel, you would measure it in fathoms (historically) but if you wanted to work out how to use Templot you would "try to fathom out Templot." What's the commonality of the word? A) you're getting to the bottom of both (the sea in the former and Templot problem in the latter). So getting from fiche to fish seems quite easy.

Derek
 
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Location
Sandbach, Cheshire
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Builder of Finescale Signals in 2mm scale to 7mm scale, Trackwork, Turnouts and Layouts.
Yet another English word that has two meanings, no wonder people find it hard to learn.
 
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