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Building Yeovil Pen Mill in EM.

Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Here is a bit more progress. The south end of this board, and the marshaling yard connection across the down main line to up main gradually taking shape with the stock rails going in


Progress at Pen Mill (3).jpg


And then with the stock rails installed and the newly filed switches lying between the rail awaiting their turn. The near end rails arent soldered to the paxolin sleeper yet, as I need to match them to rails on the next board, so that'll come a little later.

Progress at Pen Mill (1).jpg


Hope to do another update over the weekend...

Andrew
 
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Hello Andrew,
Thanks for the update - looks great. You can never have too many track gauges :) A brave man indeed with a turnout spanning a board join although at least it isn't going to be put together and taken down on a regular basis.

Have you subscribed to Jim's method of using a syringe for applying the chair solvent ? I must try it when I get onto some track laying.

Rob
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Hello Rob
It may look like I've got it across the baseboard join but in fact, it just nudges it. No, I don't apply solvent with a syringe but with a small brush....never thought of using a syringe. Funnily enough, David Brandreth (Scalefour Soc and ex Missenden organiser) uses a syringe for liquid flux and manages to get out the tiniest amounts, something that I've so far failed to master. But if I could, maybe dispensing the smelly stuff in that manner would reduce the fumes?

I do use a syringe for the Powerflux however, which I feel is invaluable to helping to keep the green mold at bay as I end up using minute amounts. That along with modest amounts of meths to wash up with afterwards, seem to do the trick.

And yes a man can never have too many track gauges, can't believe that I still sometimes seem to run out. I do wish someone made a Mint Gauge in EM. Dave Doe's black one is very similar(there's one in one the photos) but I don't think the EM Gauge Soc do it anymore. I've found using his 00 sets very good, the three point gauge was very cleverly designed to take different width rail heads.

Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Hello Rob
It may look like I've got it across the baseboard join but in fact, it just nudges it. No, I don't apply solvent with a syringe but with a small brush....never thought of using a syringe. Funnily enough, David Brandreth (Scalefour Soc and ex Missenden organiser) uses a syringe for liquid flux and manages to get out the tiniest amounts, something that I've so far failed to master. But if I could, maybe dispensing the smelly stuff in that manner would reduce the fumes?

I do use a syringe for the Powerflux however, which I feel is invaluable to helping to keep the green mold at bay as I end up using minute amounts. That along with modest amounts of meths to wash up with afterwards, seem to do the trick.

And yes a man can never have too many track gauges, can't believe that I still sometimes seem to run out. I do wish someone made a Mint Gauge in EM. Dave Doe's black one is very similar(there's one in one the photos) but I don't think the EM Gauge Soc do it anymore. I've found using his 00 sets very good, the three point gauge was very cleverly designed to take different width rail heads.

Kind regards
Andrew
Hello Andrew,
Using a syringe means that not only do you get more control over the application of the solvent/flux/etc but it also means that you haven't got a bottle with the lid off wafting it's fumes over the workspace. Knocking a syringe over isn't easily done either, unlike bottles :)

EMGS list these, and both in stock :-

Mint gauge

Block gauge

Rob
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Hello Rob
Well, that's a surprise (the Mint Gauge) I've just ordered one, so thanks very much for pointing it out. I thought I'd read somewhere that they were only available in P4 and maybe 7mm...? obviously not. As to the syringe idea what I found was that with a thin liquid like flux I found it went everywhere. I asked David about it and he suggested that I practice holding the syringe in a different manner than the usual combination of thumb and index and middle fingers. Admittedly I've not yet tried...

As to the three-point gauge, the clever thing about that was having the outer side of the pins that gripped the rail, chamfered off at an angle so that varying rail head widths could be accommodated. And it didn't try to hold the rail upright, which I expect you know, can be a nuisance when using plastic chairs that hold the rail at an angle. Tends to create under gauge track!

Thanks again
Andrew
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
Andrew

A couple of things, the latest C&L roller gauges have slots large enough to allow for the head rotation required for plastic chairs to fit at the correct angle(I think in the mist of time of various owners this requirement was forgotten about either with the slots cut too deep and or too narrow. Also a new rail die is in use for a better quality of rail profile

Second what does a mint gauge do differently to a DD Wheelrights (black) block gauge, plus why does the P4 version have a clip which can be screwed tight do , that the EM gauge version is missing (mine has a hole at one end, where as the P4 one is in the centre)



Thanks
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Andrew

A couple of things, the latest C&L roller gauges have slots large enough to allow for the head rotation required for plastic chairs to fit at the correct angle(I think in the mist of time of various owners this requirement was forgotten about either with the slots cut too deep and or too narrow. Also a new rail die is in use for a better quality of rail profile

Second what does a mint gauge do differently to a DD Wheelrights (black) block gauge, plus why does the P4 version have a clip which can be screwed tight do , that the EM gauge version is missing (mine has a hole at one end, where as the P4 one is in the centre)



Thanks
Hello John
Thanks for the reminder about the latest C&L ones which I'd forgotten all about. In fact, I think it was probably you who brought to our attention a year or so ago on this forum if I now remember correctly! As to the gauges, Mint versus Dave Doe's then I don't think they do anything different fundamentally except perhaps the presumably the extra weight of the brass(?) Mint gauge wouldn't do any harm.

When you ask about the clip which gauge are you referring to?
Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
I have both an EM gauge as shown in the stores, which is a weighty chunk. My P4 version is much thinner, fits between the rail and has a moveable clip
 

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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
I have both an EM gauge as shown in the stores, which is a weighty chunk. My P4 version is much thinner, fits between the rail and has a moveable clip
Hello John
Yes, its odd that the P4 one has a clip and EM not. Do you find the P4 one a useful addition...I'd thought quite possibly so?
Andrew
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
Andrew

Its not quite the same as it fits between the rails, unlike either the EM mint, gauge or DJ Wheelwrights black gauge. I would only use it for soldered work, as it clamps to the rail at 90 degrees, so may cause gauge narrowing with plastic chairs

I have been using the new C&L chairs recently including the J chairs, no good for GWE as the 3 bolt J chair was in BR(W) era, their functional fishplates are smaller than the Exactoscale ones
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Andrew

Its not quite the same as it fits between the rails, unlike either the EM mint, gauge or DJ Wheelwrights black gauge. I would only use it for soldered work, as it clamps to the rail at 90 degrees, so may cause gauge narrowing with plastic chairs
Ah yes of course I had thought that one through, but I see what you mean.
Thanks John
Andrew
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
and a little more progress...
The switches are now all in on the three remaining turnouts on this board.

Switches and Tie Bar construction (2).jpg



And here is one of the tie bars under construction, over length at present, this is 3mm wide copper / fiberglass laminate, presumably not called copper paxolin...? suitably gapped twice per side to be on the safe side which seems to give a nice flexible / adjustable result. and one further refinement, I've rounded the top edge to prevent any likelihood of shorting out against the underside of the stock rail. Not sure it was necessary but I did it anyway.


Switches and Tie Bar construction (1).jpg


Food and a glass of Claret are calling so I'd better go...
Andrew
 
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AndyB

Member
Claret? Look at those things sprouting out of your finger. I'd go for the Lagavulin :)

I could be wrong but I suspect Martin will be along presently to point out that inclined rails at our model scales are a load of cobulars, although I'm sure he will be a bit more polite :D
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Hello Andy
Good to see you in fine form, but no, spirits don't seem to agree with me the same way a very average French Bordeaux does and of course one can drink far more Claret than Lagavulin (I suspect, I've never tried that particular malt) and remain sober! Didn't know single malts were up to hair removal though....interesting. Better warn Rob, as he doesn't even take the precaution of drinking his whisky out of a Riedel glass, still uses Ravenhead....aaaaagh!

I dont know if you are correct in your assertion but it is a real pain having to subtly bend the closure and wing rails at the knuckle to get them lying flat and not putting a strain on the whole assembly (as without it, the wing rails try to spring back up!). I'll whisper this quietly, but I'd happily do without the incline to ease turnout construction.

Knowing human nature, or at least mine, I expect we'd be bemoaning the fact that, when he had the opportunity, Len Newman hadn't put it in, if he hadn't!!

Andrew
 
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Hello Andy
Good to see you in fine form, but no, spirits don't seem to agree with me the same way a very average French Bordeaux does and of course one can drink far more Claret than Lagavulin (I suspect, I've never tried that particular malt) and remain sober! Didn't know single malts were up to hair removal though....interesting. Better warn Rob, as he doesn't even take the precaution of drinking his whisky out of a Riedel glass, still uses Ravenhead....aaaaagh!

I dont know if you are correct in your assertion but it is a real pain having to subtly bend the closure and wing rails at the knuckle to get them lying flat and not putting a strain on the whole assembly (as without it, the wing rails try yo spring back up!). I'll whisper this quietly, but I'd happily do without the incline to ease turnout construction.

Knowing human nature, or at least mine, I expect we'd be bemoaning the fact that, when he had the opportunity, Len Newman hadn't put it in, if he hadn't!!

Andrew
Hello Andrew,
Having got my Covid jab on Saturday I am glad I had some decent scotch to hand - it seems to have done the trick, my shakes have ceased and I can climb up the stairs without having to stop halfway :) I would have had it straight from the bottle if there hadn't been a tea cup handy.

Still at least I should be a little safer now. Nobody should refuse a vaccination on my experience though.

Rob
 
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Martin Wynne

Admin
Location
West of the Severn UK
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Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Still at least I should be a little safer now. Nobody should refuse a vaccination on my experience though.

Hi Rob,

Had mine today. So far no reaction, but I have a boiled egg ready if needed. :)

Strangely it was Pfizer, despite everyone else here in my age group getting Oxford-Astra. No explanation offered. I did notice that everyone else getting theirs today seemed younger than me. Perhaps that's the reason.

I did shoot the TV with my popgun when Boris said at the weekend that everyone over 70 had already been done. I'm 72.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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Hi Rob,

Had mine today. So far no reaction, but I have a boiled egg ready if needed. :)

Strangely it was Pfizer, despite everyone else here in my age group getting Oxford-Astra. No explanation offered. I did notice that everyone else getting theirs today seemed younger than me. Perhaps that's the reason.

I did shoot the TV with my popgun when Boris said at the weekend that everyone over 70 had already been done. I'm 72.

cheers,

Martin.
Hi Martin,
My wife got the call last friday ( she is 64 ) and when I took her to be vaccinated they had spare doses so I got one too( age 60 ) - we both had the Oxford one. I still have the sore arm but the crazy shakes that started about 10 hours after the jab and the totally knackered feeling that came on soon afterwards have gone. I never had any reaction to the flu jab in recent years.

Eat the egg and ignore Boris - maybe you would rather live in Wales or Scotland and put up with their leaders ?

Seeing as you seem partial to the eggs you can make a hearty meal using them with quinoa and turkey - all 3 foods offer nutritionally complete and easy to digest amino acids.

Rob
 
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AndyB

Member
We both had our first shots about a week ago. Just some minor effects.

Going slightly tangential (as is usual for me) here is my conical, or possibly comical, incline thingamajig. It rolls along straight track or gentle curves without falling off. It sways gently from side to side as it goes. It's also quite good for detecting gradients where there should be none :)

(Keen observers will note that it is sitting on SMP MK1 bullhead track. Not terribly convincing these days but a big improvement at the time.)

Apologies for the interruption Andrew. Please carry on.

DSCN5000.JPG
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
Just to join the jab/wine fray, the wife and I had our jabs on Thursday, we both had sore arms, mine only lasting a day or so Carol's a bit longer, she also felt very tired the following day, I guess in one way a mild reaction is good as the body is reacting to the vaccine

As for the wine/scotch debate I like a good blend of whiskey with a tiny drop of water, dislike the very peaty singles. As for wine for a few years I have enjoyed Chiroubles (Beaujolais) Georges Duboeuf being a good example, what I call a Sunday lunch wine as its not too heave. Morrisons do a very good Beaujolais Villages as a replacement. Sunday I had a very nice white Burgundy with our lamb

Something I am working on using code 83 flatbottom and Pandrol fixings (yes I have the correct rail now)

330.jpeg
 
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