Building Yeovil Pen Mill in EM.

Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Hello Andrew,
Having got my Covid jab on Saturday I am glad I had some decent scotch to hand - it seems to have done the trick, my shakes have ceased and I can climb up the stairs without having to stop halfway :) I would have had it straight from the bottle if there hadn't been a tea cup handy.

Still at least I should be a little safer now. Nobody should refuse a vaccination on my experience though.

Rob
Well Rob if your taking it as medicine then that's one thing,,but if you want to taste it you need Riedel. No argument!!
 
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Keith Armes

Member
Location
Macclesfield
Hi Martin,
My wife got the call last friday ( she is 64 ) and when I took her to be vaccinated they had spare doses so I got one too( age 60 ) - we both had the Oxford one. I still have the sore arm but the crazy shakes that started about 10 hours after the jab and the totally knackered feeling that came on soon afterwards have gone. I never had any reaction to the flu jab in recent years.

Eat the egg and ignore Boris - maybe you would rather live in Wales or Scotland and put up with their leaders ?

Seeing as you seem partial to the eggs you can make a hearty meal using them with quinoa and turkey - all 3 foods offer nutritionally complete and easy to digest amino acids.

Rob
This discussion is making me feel very old at 78, but I have had my jab!
Keith
 
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Just to join the jab/wine fray, the wife and I had our jabs on Thursday, we both had sore arms, mine only lasting a day or so Carol's a bit longer, she also felt very tired the following day, I guess in one way a mild reaction is good as the body is reacting to the vaccine

As for the wine/scotch debate I like a good blend of whiskey with a tiny drop of water, dislike the very peaty singles. As for wine for a few years I have enjoyed Chiroubles (Beaujolais) Georges Duboeuf being a good example, what I call a Sunday lunch wine as its not too heave. Morrisons do a very good Beaujolais Villages as a replacement. Sunday I had a very nice white Burgundy with our lamb

Something I am working on using code 83 flatbottom and Pandrol fixings (yes I have the correct rail now)

View attachment 303

Hi John,
I am interested to see how you get on ( with the track not the whisky and wine ) - why don't you start a new topic and post some pics as you go. What gauge is it - will be interested to see you tackle to chairing(?) of the common crossing and check rail areas.

Put a handle on the tang of that file too before it bites you - even if it doesn't look that sharp :)

Rob
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Guinea Pig Tester

Done, but not up to Andrews standards
Hello John
Not up to my standards? You’re the one who worries if you’re putting the right type of chair in a particular location. I’m please if I remember to shove half a slide chair to support the knuckle!
kind regards
Andrew
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
What's accompanying your Sunday lunch this week, we have Pork so I thought I would try an Alsace Pino Gris for a change (been watching too much Rick Stein in France lately)
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
John
I'm a bit of an unimaginative wine drinker. My go to wines are red Bordeauxs and if drinking before a meal then it's either Sauvignon Blanc for a light refreshing drink not unlike Pinot Grigio but more acidic, or at the other end of the spectrum an oaked Chardonnay(the one the ABC people love to scoff at ...shame) but I don't think I've tried Pino Gris which I understand is related Pinot Grigio, but somewhat more complex, so I'd be interested to hear how it goes down.

Andrew
 
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Martin Wynne

Admin
Location
West of the Severn UK
Info
Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
To grab a quick screenshot, it's one of these! The red rails are the loose heel blades which are simply moved to the appropriate exit track.

Hi Paul,

How are you working the stub switch?

While working on the archive for the old forum I found this idea for working 3-way stub switches:

3_way_switch_drive.png


Looks as if it might work. :)

But no good for more than 3 ways without additional cranks and levers.

cheers,

Martin.
 
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Paul Boyd

Member
Location
Loughborough, UK
Hi Paul,

How are you working the stub switch?

While working on the archive for the old forum I found this idea for working 3-way stub switches:

3_way_switch_drive.png


Looks as if it might work. :)

But no good for more than 3 ways without additional cranks and levers.

cheers,

Martin.

Hi Martin

The original plan was to use something along those lines, and that's what I did on a previous 3-way stub point, but as I'm using CBUS with Universal software there's a mode that allows a servo to have up to four positions so that appealed. Then reality hit - can I really make a mechanism that can accurately position the blades in the centre position every time, over time, regardless of which direction they're moving from? How accurate are the servos? I know that a bigger movement would give more "resolution".

So - back to plan A, more or less as shown above. There are far fewer pivots that need to be slop-free - the cross-bar centre pivot and the dropper wires into the "slider", as it's called above. Using Universal firmware still allows me to just press a button for the required exit so I don't have to think about operating each servo separately. Much as I'd love to build a 5-way stub point just for fun, they weren't exactly commonplace on UK narrow gauge! Then again, I suppose my 3-way wouldn't have been that common either, but there was one at Porthmadog, now installed in Minffordd, so that'll do me!

Cheers,
Paul
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
John
I'm a bit of an unimaginative wine drinker. My go to wines are red Bordeauxs and if drinking before a meal then it's either Sauvignon Blanc for a light refreshing drink not unlike Pinot Grigio but more acidic, or at the other end of the spectrum an oaked Chardonnay(the one the ABC people love to scoff at ...shame) but I don't think I've tried Pino Gris which I understand is related Pinot Grigio, but somewhat more complex, so I'd be interested to hear how it goes down.

Andrew

Andrew

I forgot to reply, the Pino Gris was very nice. I followed it up a week later with an Alsace which was not to my taste (nothing wrong with the wine). Moved on to Italy last week with a Gavi. As we have beef this Sunday back to red Beaujolais Villages, but I restocked my white wine with another Italian wine, a Falanghina, from the Naples region. But as we have beef this week it will have to wait

I am no wine expert and whilst these are not dirt cheap wines, all are quite inexpensive, I just like having a change with the whites, perhaps I should be more adventurous with the reds !!
 
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John S

Member
Hayfield said,

"I am no wine expert and whilst these are not dirt cheap wines, all are quite inexpensive, I just like having a change with the whites, perhaps I should be more adventurous with the reds !!"

If you can find them in your neck of the woods I suggest you try a Côtes de Blaye, my favourite amongst the local producers is Domaine de Cassard, but I doubt that you'll find them other than direct purchase. Côtes de Blaye is as good, and often better, than the more well known and more expensive Bordeaux wines.

John S from 33820 St Ciers sur Gironde
 
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AndyB

Member
I confess. When it comes to wines I am probably a Philistine (if it's still PC to say that).

My red comes in a box :giggle:. Bota Box "Nighthalk Black" to be precise, and jolly good it is too. (TBH I was drinking red wine in France when I was ten years old. In today's terms Mum and Dad were quite liberal.)

Seriously, boxed wines might not look so attractive but they have the distinct advantage of keeping fresh for a long time after they are opened.
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
I confess. When it comes to wines I am probably a Philistine (if it's still PC to say that).

My red comes in a box :giggle:. Bota Box "Nighthalk Black" to be precise, and jolly good it is too. (TBH I was drinking red wine in France when I was ten years old. In today's terms Mum and Dad were quite liberal.)

Seriously, boxed wines might not look so attractive but they have the distinct advantage of keeping fresh for a long time after they are opened.

I have drunk from and brought wine (and cider) in boxes and its fine. Unless we have a dinner party all we do is have a glass of wine with our main meal, my wife stretches her bottle (Rose) over 5 nights, my bottle lasts about 4 nights.

When I was working a bottle may have lasted 2 or 3 weeks, longer after dinner parties if I had white, red and rose opened. For years we have used these vac pumps
https://www.procook.co.uk/product/p...5_lkemAzk4kq11oAq7th_g1FmOuNrHh4aAhQnEALw_wcB (ours is years old and white)

In fact red wine tastes better the next day as the wine had time to breath. We have had bottles last 3 weeks or more in the past as the air is removed from the bottle and the wine goes back into a dormant stage
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Andrew

I forgot to reply, the Pino Gris was very nice. I followed it up a week later with an Alsace which was not to my taste (nothing wrong with the wine). Moved on to Italy last week with a Gavi. As we have beef this Sunday back to red Beaujolais Villages, but I restocked my white wine with another Italian wine, a Falanghina, from the Naples region. But as we have beef this week it will have to wait

I am no wine expert and whilst these are not dirt cheap wines, all are quite inexpensive, I just like having a change with the whites, perhaps I should be more adventurous with the reds !!
Hello John
I see your organisation and attention to detail goes way outside just your choice of "chair" to knowing what you're going to have for Sunday lunch, on a Wednesday, I find impressive!. You further impress me with your wanderings around Europe seeking out interesting new wines. If you're feeling like it perhaps you'll let me/us know how the Falanghina went down.
Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Hayfield said,

"I am no wine expert and whilst these are not dirt cheap wines, all are quite inexpensive, I just like having a change with the whites, perhaps I should be more adventurous with the reds !!"

If you can find them in your neck of the woods I suggest you try a Côtes de Blaye, my favourite amongst the local producers is Domaine de Cassard, but I doubt that you'll find them other than direct purchase. Côtes de Blaye is as good, and often better, than the more well known and more expensive Bordeaux wines.

John S from 33820 St Ciers sur Gironde
Thanks for your suggestion John, I'll give it a go when I'm next wine shopping.
Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Andrew Duncan

Member
Location
Reigate
Hello Everyone
A little more progress, with the turnouts on board no 6, the northernmost board, and last baseboard to be completed for Yeovil. The switches are in now, along with the check rails and most of the cosmetic chairs that hide soldered joints etc. Photo taken from the southern end, looking north to the exit that leads to the fiddleyard.

Board 6 March 2021 (1).jpg



And here's a similar view taken about the same time but from the extreme northern end looking south towards the station itself. On the right is a double slip I built on a curve, but without moving K crossings (possible mistake there!) that I've a feeling may give me trouble in the long run. Rather more happily a little further away and on the main down line, in the photo is the single slip that does have moving K crossings and that I have rather more confidence in.

Board 6 March 2021 (2).jpg



And lastly here's some of the infill plain track that's either pinned in place temporarily or just laid in place. The idea is to spray all the track with Halfords grey primer, then attack it with my airbrush, a little. Then if I'm feeling motivated enough ballast the pointwork. Then remove each piece of infill track one at a time and re-lay in a bed of glue and ballast at the same time.

Board 6 March 2021 (3).jpg


That's it for tonight I think. Maybe time for a wee tipple before beddy byes...?
Kind regards
Andrew
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
Hello John
I see your organisation and attention to detail goes way outside just your choice of "chair" to knowing what you're going to have for Sunday lunch, on a Wednesday, I find impressive!. You further impress me with your wanderings around Europe seeking out interesting new wines. If you're feeling like it perhaps you'll let me/us know how the Falanghina went down.
Kind regards
Andrew
We try and shop once a week, I am mainly there as a labourer. We have always thought Morrisons have the best meat of the supermarkets, and when we moved Morrisons was our nearest shop. This week we got a super bit of beef (it was on offer). Quite often we get 3 meals from a joint. I go off and wander the wine and coffee isles, like all supermarkets they have their own range and I like trying their "The Best" range. I prefer to drink less but slightly better these days. Rather than 2 for a tenner spend £7 or £8 on a bottle, for some you might have to spend a tenner. But its so much better. Old world wines seem to me to be better

We went to a wine tasting at a vineyard in Deadham (well worth it) and a similar one in Italy (lake Garda) where they tell you lots about wine, but they open up your eyes to try something different. I must have a look at other reds, but I do like the less full bodied red wines.

The Falanghina will have to wait a week, we love going to Italy and drinking their wines, now there is much more selection available in our shops
 
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Hayfield

Member
Location
Essex
Hello Everyone
A little more progress, with the turnouts on board no 6, the northernmost board, and last baseboard to be completed for Yeovil. The switches are in now, along with the check rails and most of the cosmetic chairs that hide soldered joints etc. Photo taken from the southern end, looking north to the exit that leads to the fiddleyard.

View attachment 508


And here's a similar view taken about the same time but from the extreme northern end looking south towards the station itself. On the right is a double slip I built on a curve, but without moving K crossings (possible mistake there!) that I've a feeling may give me trouble in the long run. Rather more happily a little further away and on the main down line, in the photo is the single slip that does have moving K crossings and that I have rather more confidence in.

View attachment 509


And lastly here's some of the infill plain track that's either pinned in place temporarily or just laid in place. The idea is to spray all the track with Halfords grey primer, then attack it with my airbrush, a little. Then if I'm feeling motivated enough ballast the pointwork. Then remove each piece of infill track one at a time and re-lay in a bed of glue and ballast at the same time.

View attachment 510

That's it for tonight I think. Maybe time for a wee tipple before beddy byes...?
Kind regards
Andrew

Andrew a stunning piece of track building, larger turnouts and crossings do have an air of spender about them. I currently have a facing crossing with a V8 and 12' heal, with hopefully the rail joints in the correct positions and 4 timber check rails
 
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Keith Armes

Member
Location
Macclesfield
Hello Everyone
A little more progress, with the turnouts on board no 6, the northernmost board, and last baseboard to be completed for Yeovil. The switches are in now, along with the check rails and most of the cosmetic chairs that hide soldered joints etc. Photo taken from the southern end, looking north to the exit that leads to the fiddleyard.

View attachment 508


And here's a similar view taken about the same time but from the extreme northern end looking south towards the station itself. On the right is a double slip I built on a curve, but without moving K crossings (possible mistake there!) that I've a feeling may give me trouble in the long run. Rather more happily a little further away and on the main down line, in the photo is the single slip that does have moving K crossings and that I have rather more confidence in.

View attachment 509


And lastly here's some of the infill plain track that's either pinned in place temporarily or just laid in place. The idea is to spray all the track with Halfords grey primer, then attack it with my airbrush, a little. Then if I'm feeling motivated enough ballast the pointwork. Then remove each piece of infill track one at a time and re-lay in a bed of glue and ballast at the same time.

View attachment 510

That's it for tonight I think. Maybe time for a wee tipple before beddy byes...?
Kind regards
Andrew
That looks lovely, Andrew. I hope you get away with your fixed, curved K crossings.

Many years ago I built a curved 2FS fixed diamond at 1:8 for a customer, When it came to be used recently, he spent hours trying to make everything work. Pushing short wheelbase wagons proved its downfall. Every time he went bed with it working OK, he woke up to find it had gone back to derailing the wagons. In the end I built him a replacement at 1:7. Perhaps the short wheelbase wagons could crab more than the other vehicles, we don't know.

Incidentally, the 2FS standards are the same proportions as EM, except the flange depth is proportionally greater at 0.5mm, instead of 0.35mm.

Keith
 
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